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White and worried.

tommygunz

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Get Shredded!
Trump Voters Driven by Fear of Losing Status, Not Economic Anxiety, Study Finds

image
A Trump supporter at a campaign rally in Sacramento in June 2016. A new study found that many Trump voters were driven by fear of losing their status in society.
DAMON WINTER/THE NEW YORK TIMES
By NIRAJ CHOKSHI
April 24, 2018
Ever since Donald J. Trump began his improbable political rise, many pundits have credited his appeal among white, Christian and male voters to “economic anxiety.” Hobbled by unemployment and locked out of the recovery, those voters turned out in force to send Mr. Trump, and a message, to Washington.

Or so that narrative goes.

A study published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences questions that explanation, the latest to suggest that Trump voters weren’t driven by anger over the past, but rather fear of what may come. White, Christian and male voters, the study suggests, turned to Mr. Trump because they felt their status was at risk.

“It’s much more of a symbolic threat that people feel,’’ said Diana C. Mutz, the author of the study and a political science and communications professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where she directs the Institute for the Study of Citizens and Politics. “It’s not a threat to their own economic well-being; it’s a threat to their group’s dominance in our country over all.”

The study is not the first to cast doubt on the prevailing economic anxiety theory. Last year, a Public Religion Research Institute survey of more than 3,000 people also found that Mr. Trump’s appeal could better be explained by a fear of cultural displacement.

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In her study, Dr. Mutz sought to answer two questions: Is there evidence to support the economic anxiety argument, and did the fear of losing social dominance drive some voters to Mr. Trump? To find answers, she analyzed survey data from a nationally representative group of about 1,200 voters polled in 2012 and 2016.

In both years, participants were asked the same wide-ranging set of questions. Party loyalty overwhelmingly explained how most people voted, but Dr. Mutz’s statistical analysis focused on those who bucked the trend, switching their support to the Republican candidate, Mr. Trump, in 2016.

Leaving Behind the ‘Left Behind’ Theory

Even before conducting her analysis, Dr. Mutz noted two reasons for skepticism of the economic anxiety, or “left behind,” theory. First, the economy was improving before the 2016 presidential campaign. Second, while research has suggested that voters are swayed by the economy, there is little evidence that their own financial situation similarly influences their choices at the ballot box.

The analysis offered even more reason for doubt.

Losing a job or income between 2012 and 2016 did not make a person any more likely to support Mr. Trump, Dr. Mutz found. Neither did the mere perception that one’s financial situation had worsened. A person’s opinion on how trade affected personal finances had little bearing on political preferences. Neither did unemployment or the density of manufacturing jobs in one’s area.

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“It wasn’t people in those areas that were switching, those folks were already voting Republican,” Dr. Mutz said.

Sign Up for the Race/Related Newsletter Join a deep and provocative exploration of race with a diverse group of New York Times journalists.
For further evidence, Dr. Mutz also analyzed a separate survey, conducted in 2016 by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. It showed that anxieties about retirement, education and medical bills also had little impact on whether a person supported Mr. Trump.

Last year’s Public Religion Research Institute report went even further, finding a link, albeit a weak one, between poor white, working-class Americans and support for Hillary Clinton.

Status Under Threat: ‘Things Have Changed’

While economic anxiety did not explain Mr. Trump’s appeal, Dr. Mutz found reason instead to credit those whose thinking changed in ways that reflected a growing sense of racial or global threat.

ADVERTISEMENT

In 2012, voters perceived little difference between themselves and the candidates on trade. But, by 2016, the voters had moved slightly right, while they perceived Mr. Trump as moving about as far right as Mrs. Clinton had moved left. As a result, the voters, in a defensive crouch, found themselves closer to Mr. Trump.

On the threat posed by China, voters hardly moved between 2012 and 2016, but while they perceived both presidential candidates as being to their left in 2012, they found Mr. Trump as having moved just to their right by 2016, again placing them closer to the Republican candidate than the Democratic one.

In both cases, the findings revealed a fear that American global dominance was in danger, a belief that benefited Mr. Trump and the Republican Party.

“The shift toward an antitrade stance was a particularly effective strategy for capitalizing on a public experiencing status threat due to race as well as globalization,” Dr. Mutz wrote in the study.

ADVERTISEMENT

Her survey also assessed “social dominance orientation,” a common psychological measure of a person’s belief in hierarchy as necessary and inherent to a society. People who exhibited a growing belief in such group dominance were also more likely to move toward Mr. Trump, Dr. Mutz found, reflecting their hope that the status quo be protected.

“It used to be a pretty good deal to be a white, Christian male in America, but things have changed and I think they do feel threatened,” Dr. Mutz said.

The other surveys supported the cultural anxiety explanation, too.

For example, Trump support was linked to a belief that high-status groups, such as whites, Christians or men, faced more discrimination than low-status groups, like minorities, Muslims or women, according to Dr. Mutz’s analysis of the University of Chicago study.

What does it matter which kind of anxiety — cultural or economic — explains Mr. Trump’s appeal?

If wrong, the prevailing economic theory lends unfounded virtue to his victory, crediting it to the disaffected masses, Dr. Mutz argues. More important, she said, it would teach the wrong lesson to elected officials, who often look to voting patterns in enacting new policy.

ADVERTISEMENT



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You just posted this the other day:
Why does every thread on this board degrade into a name calling, stupid liberal vs conservative pissing match?


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And then you sling this mud. Come on bro.

I voted for Trump and can promise you nothing in that article ever crossed my mind. This is just the way of the world and politics. Dems get their shot, Repubs get tired of their shit and turn out to vote, dems get tired of their shit and turn out to vote and the cycle repeats.
 
no interviews done with actual people who voted. this is all getting tired, they cant figure out how hillary lost, has to been a reason other than she lost fair and square, must be scared white folks, where were the scared white folks when obama was elected
 
boattrails.jpg
 
You just posted this the other day:

And then you sling this mud. Come on bro.

I voted for Trump and can promise you nothing in that article ever crossed my mind. This is just the way of the world and politics. Dems get their shot, Repubs get tired of their shit and turn out to vote, dems get tired of their shit and turn out to vote and the cycle repeats.

I was thinking the same thing, this thread is exactly why
 
It’s just a news story fellas that I thought interesting enough to share. You guys do what you want with it ( quoting heavyiron here). It’s not written by a political party, it’s just a research . If it bothers you move on, or as Rob says “ it’s the pit, get the sand out of your vag”.


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:coffee:..That's the last thing these 'whitie righties' want to hear ....being a 'white Christian male' is all they got going on...they can always 'gang up' on somebody.. lol :roflmao:
 
I was thinking the same thing, this thread is exactly why

No, actually it’s not brother. It’s the disrespectful behavior that happens when some one posts something that’s unpopular.




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Trump Voters Driven by Fear of Losing Status, Not Economic Anxiety, Study Finds

image
A Trump supporter at a campaign rally in Sacramento in June 2016. A new study found that many Trump voters were driven by fear of losing their status in society.
DAMON WINTER/THE NEW YORK TIMES
By NIRAJ CHOKSHI
April 24, 2018
Ever since Donald J. Trump began his improbable political rise, many pundits have credited his appeal among white, Christian and male voters to “economic anxiety.” Hobbled by unemployment and locked out of the recovery, those voters turned out in force to send Mr. Trump, and a message, to Washington.

Or so that narrative goes.

A study published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences questions that explanation, the latest to suggest that Trump voters weren’t driven by anger over the past, but rather fear of what may come. White, Christian and male voters, the study suggests, turned to Mr. Trump because they felt their status was at risk.

“It’s much more of a symbolic threat that people feel,’’ said Diana C. Mutz, the author of the study and a political science and communications professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where she directs the Institute for the Study of Citizens and Politics. “It’s not a threat to their own economic well-being; it’s a threat to their group’s dominance in our country over all.”

The study is not the first to cast doubt on the prevailing economic anxiety theory. Last year, a Public Religion Research Institute survey of more than 3,000 people also found that Mr. Trump’s appeal could better be explained by a fear of cultural displacement.

ADVERTISEMENT

In her study, Dr. Mutz sought to answer two questions: Is there evidence to support the economic anxiety argument, and did the fear of losing social dominance drive some voters to Mr. Trump? To find answers, she analyzed survey data from a nationally representative group of about 1,200 voters polled in 2012 and 2016.

In both years, participants were asked the same wide-ranging set of questions. Party loyalty overwhelmingly explained how most people voted, but Dr. Mutz’s statistical analysis focused on those who bucked the trend, switching their support to the Republican candidate, Mr. Trump, in 2016.

Leaving Behind the ‘Left Behind’ Theory

Even before conducting her analysis, Dr. Mutz noted two reasons for skepticism of the economic anxiety, or “left behind,” theory. First, the economy was improving before the 2016 presidential campaign. Second, while research has suggested that voters are swayed by the economy, there is little evidence that their own financial situation similarly influences their choices at the ballot box.

The analysis offered even more reason for doubt.

Losing a job or income between 2012 and 2016 did not make a person any more likely to support Mr. Trump, Dr. Mutz found. Neither did the mere perception that one’s financial situation had worsened. A person’s opinion on how trade affected personal finances had little bearing on political preferences. Neither did unemployment or the density of manufacturing jobs in one’s area.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It wasn’t people in those areas that were switching, those folks were already voting Republican,” Dr. Mutz said.

Sign Up for the Race/Related Newsletter Join a deep and provocative exploration of race with a diverse group of New York Times journalists.
For further evidence, Dr. Mutz also analyzed a separate survey, conducted in 2016 by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. It showed that anxieties about retirement, education and medical bills also had little impact on whether a person supported Mr. Trump.

Last year’s Public Religion Research Institute report went even further, finding a link, albeit a weak one, between poor white, working-class Americans and support for Hillary Clinton.

Status Under Threat: ‘Things Have Changed’

While economic anxiety did not explain Mr. Trump’s appeal, Dr. Mutz found reason instead to credit those whose thinking changed in ways that reflected a growing sense of racial or global threat.

ADVERTISEMENT

In 2012, voters perceived little difference between themselves and the candidates on trade. But, by 2016, the voters had moved slightly right, while they perceived Mr. Trump as moving about as far right as Mrs. Clinton had moved left. As a result, the voters, in a defensive crouch, found themselves closer to Mr. Trump.

On the threat posed by China, voters hardly moved between 2012 and 2016, but while they perceived both presidential candidates as being to their left in 2012, they found Mr. Trump as having moved just to their right by 2016, again placing them closer to the Republican candidate than the Democratic one.

In both cases, the findings revealed a fear that American global dominance was in danger, a belief that benefited Mr. Trump and the Republican Party.

“The shift toward an antitrade stance was a particularly effective strategy for capitalizing on a public experiencing status threat due to race as well as globalization,” Dr. Mutz wrote in the study.

ADVERTISEMENT

Her survey also assessed “social dominance orientation,” a common psychological measure of a person’s belief in hierarchy as necessary and inherent to a society. People who exhibited a growing belief in such group dominance were also more likely to move toward Mr. Trump, Dr. Mutz found, reflecting their hope that the status quo be protected.

“It used to be a pretty good deal to be a white, Christian male in America, but things have changed and I think they do feel threatened,” Dr. Mutz said.

The other surveys supported the cultural anxiety explanation, too.

For example, Trump support was linked to a belief that high-status groups, such as whites, Christians or men, faced more discrimination than low-status groups, like minorities, Muslims or women, according to Dr. Mutz’s analysis of the University of Chicago study.

What does it matter which kind of anxiety — cultural or economic — explains Mr. Trump’s appeal?

If wrong, the prevailing economic theory lends unfounded virtue to his victory, crediting it to the disaffected masses, Dr. Mutz argues. More important, she said, it would teach the wrong lesson to elected officials, who often look to voting patterns in enacting new policy.

ADVERTISEMENT



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According to my wife I have no status so I guess Im safe!

- - - Updated - - -

:coffee:..That's the last thing these 'whitie righties' want to hear ....being a 'white Christian male' is all they got going on...they can always 'gang up' on somebody.. lol :roflmao:

What color are you Charlie?
 
Nah, more foolish media nonsense,anyone who believes anything at all reported in the news today is absolutely a fuck-tard themselves and have much more serious issues.
Foolish times, foolish people...
 
No, actually it’s not brother. It’s the disrespectful behavior that happens when some one posts something that’s unpopular.




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Labeling a Trump voter as white and worried could be deemed pretty disrespectful, imo.

Personally I really don't care. Just pointing out what I thought was a little hypocrisy.
 
Labeling a Trump voter as white and worried could be deemed pretty disrespectful, imo.

Personally I really don't care. Just pointing out what I thought was a little hypocrisy.

I didn’t label anyone. I copied and pasted a news article and paraphrased a title. I never mentioned anything about voting for anyone. I’m white and worried and voted for the other candidate. If I voted for Trump and posted this thread, then I’d be a hipocrite.


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Get Shredded!
no interviews done with actual people who voted.
And you know this how? The article said they surveyed voters, twice. You should read it and then back up your statement with facts.



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.... I am white 95.4 % British/Irish 4.6% German.....

..... and you are white ??

are you ashamed of your whiteness?

do you feel some kind of special privilege because you’re white?
 
You don't need a study to show there's low to info voters on both sides of the aisle. I'm sure some white people may have voted for a reason as silly as that just like there were black people who voted for Obama simply because he's black.

Breaking news some people vote for stupid reasons.
 
Last edited:
are you ashamed of your whiteness?

do you feel some kind of special privilege because you’re white?


are you ashamed of your whiteness?
NO

do you feel some kind of special privilege because you’re white?
NO

Question ... why do you seem to be afraid of people of color or different ethnicity than you ???
 
Reply to Charlie.

Im just me...
I work for a living, made my own way by working triple over time when I was young, put myself through college (past my GI bennies) and took great risks to achieve my goals. I took no grants, no loans and I dont owe anyone anything. In short, I dont have time for these political games. You however.... every post you make is playing the victim card... I will never figure out how people think these things constitute a life...
 
Reply to Charlie.

Im just me...
I work for a living, made my own way by working triple over time when I was young, put myself through college (past my GI bennies) and took great risks to achieve my goals. I took no grants, no loans and I dont owe anyone anything. In short, I dont have time for these political games. You however.... every post you make is playing the victim card... I will never figure out how people think these things constitute a life...

.... you ask me if I'm white.... I tell you.. yes I am ... I ask you what color you are and you play games ... is this another victim post ???

... ARE YOU WHITE ??? & stop making a victim out of yourself...
 
It takes a hell of a lot of white people to elect a black guy president and we did just that...twice
 
.... you ask me if I'm white.... I tell you.. yes I am ... I ask you what color you are and you play games ... is this another victim post ???

... ARE YOU WHITE ??? & stop making a victim out of yourself...

You cant see my avatar? Lol.... Rob was right...
 
why do white ppl back down when a black guy gets in there face.. Tell a good lie , like i never seen that happen.. I did about 30 white guys 1 black guy rolls up takes off his belt and says ill beat the 1st mf who steps to me along with the n word he was yelling.... Whats my point you ask well when white ppl say are you ashamed of being white.. I belive they are.. hillary was my go to but not trump.....im brown btw....

cheapthreads out..
 
It takes a hell of a lot of white people to elect a black guy president and we did just that...twice

Now this is a good talking point.
Do you think it was a fluke? I mean maybe the first time but what about the re-election? I’m genuinely curious about this.



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