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Eating for recovery before bed..Facts vs Myths (lets debate)

Vision

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Get Shredded!

"Let's debate"

Who using what sups and why (prove facts on effectiveness/not by the manufacture)

Eating for recovery before bed..Facts vs Myths

I just wanted to put this out there, because to many bro's advocate-

"Long as you hit your required protein macros before bed then there is no need to take it before bed IMO - Vision""

There is some absolute truth with consuming slow/fast acting proteins.

The speed of absorption of dietary amino acids varies according to the type of ingested dietary protein... Learn just how important slow and fast proteins, taken at the appropriate time, can affect your ability to put on lean mass.
Many people avoid eating right before bed as they fear that the calories are more likely to be stored as fat. This is not the case though. Your body doesn't have an on-off switch and you still burn calories while you sleep. According to the American Dietetic Association, it's excess calories that determine whether you gain weight, not when you eat them. Too many calories at breakfast or lunch will be just as detrimental as too many calories right before bed.

Premise
As much as we may think of bodybuilding as a cloistered subculture, we are forever bombarded with training and nutritional tips from sources far removed from squat racks and posing daises. So it is with this axiom, which is such a ubiquitous feature of the sort of diets Oprah hypes that many beginning bodybuilders dare not breach it, and it breeds confusion about what and when to eat to gain only muscle and not fat


Science
When you sleep, you?re on a fast. During that fast, your body is forced to turn to your own muscle protein for fuel, converting those amino acids into glucose. In other words, while you?re in dreamland, you?re experiencing the nightmare of cannibalizing your own muscles. The longer you go before sleep without eating, the more your muscle will be eaten away. That?s why we always recommend that you end your day with a slow-digesting protein, such as a casein protein shake or cottage cheese.
(
Research from Groups located in Texas, and even the Netherlands discovered that trained bodybuilders drinking a casein protein shake right before bed for eight weeks gained significantly more muscle than those who consumed the same casein shake in the middle of the day.)

Verdict
We started with the easiest myth to shoot down, for not only is it OK to chow down long after sundown, it?s crucial to eat a protein meal immediately before going to bed in order to feed your muscles the nutrients they need to recover and grow while you sleep. Go with 20-40 grams of slow-digesting protein, such as a casein shake or cottage cheese. If you?re trying to pack on mass and don?t store fat easily, take your protein with about 20-40 g of slow-digesting carbs, such as oatmeal, sweet potatoes or whole-wheat bread.


Now with this being said:

Read the study and see the charts in regards to why a slow releasing protein has a full advantage (pre-sleep)

Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion. Boirie Y, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997 Dec 23;94(26):14930-5.Full text at:
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA
Vol. 94, pp. 14930?14935, December 1997
Physiology

Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial
protein accretion

(amino acid turnoverypostprandial protein anabolismymilk proteinystable isotopes)
YVES BOIRIE*, MARTIAL DANGIN*?, PIERRE GACHON*, MARIE-PAULE VASSON?, JEAN-LOUIS MAUBOIS?,
AND BERNARD BEAUFRE`RE*?
*Laboratoire de Nutrition Humaine, Universite? Clermont Auvergne, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine, BP 321, 63009 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1,
France; ?Nestec, Ltd., Nestle? Research Center, P.O. Box 44, CH 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland; ?Laboratoire de Biochimie, Biologie Mole?culaire et Nutrition,
Universite? Clermont Auvergne, BP 38, 63001 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France; and ?Laboratoire de Technologie Laitie`re, Institut National de la Recherche
Agronomique, 35042 Rennes Cedex, France
Communicated by John Waterlow, University of London, London, United Kingdom, October 7, 1997 (received for review April 20, 1997)
?
In relation to the 1997 Boirie study, Lyle summarized that the researchers found the following: whey spiked blood amino acid levels faster than casein, but blood amino acid levels dropped more quickly as well. Casein, in contrast, took much longer to digest, actually providing amino acids for around 8 hours to the body ... Both casein and whey hit the bloodstream at about the same time (about an hour in), that is, whey didn?t actually get into the system faster. However, whey spiked blood amino acid levels higher at that one hour point.
proteingraphic.jpg

33kbsc6.jpg


ABSTRACT


The speed of absorption of dietary amino
acids by the gut varies according to the type of ingested dietary
protein. This could affect postprandial protein synthesis,
breakdown, and deposition. To test this hypothesis, two intrinsically
13C-leucine-labeled milk proteins, casein (CAS)
and whey protein (WP), of different physicochemical properties
were ingested as one single meal by healthy adults.
Postprandial whole body leucine kinetics were assessed by
using a dual tracer methodology. WP induced a dramatic but
short increase of plasma amino acids. CAS induced a prolonged
plateau of moderate hyperaminoacidemia, probably
because of a slow gastric emptying. Whole body protein
breakdown was inhibited by 34% after CAS ingestion but not
after WP ingestion. Postprandial protein synthesis was stimulated
by 68% with the WP meal and to a lesser extent (131%)
with the CAS meal. Postprandial whole body leucine oxidation
over 7 h was lower with CAS (272 6 91 mmolzkg21) than with
WP (373 6 56 mmolzkg21). Leucine intake was identical in
both meals (380 mmolzkg21). Therefore, net leucine balance
over the 7 h after the meal was more positive with CAS than
with WP (P < 0.05, WP vs. CAS). In conclusion, the speed of
protein digestion and amino acid absorption from the gut has
a major effect on whole body protein anabolism after one
single meal. By analogy with carbohydrate metabolism, slow
and fast proteins modulate the postprandial metabolic response,
a concept to be applied to wasting situations.
Dietary carbohydrates are commonly classified as slow and fast
because it now is well recognized that their structure affects
their speed of absorption, which in turn has a major impact on
the metabolic and hormonal response to a meal (1). On the
other hand, little is known about whether postprandial protein
kinetics are affected by the speed of absorption of dietary
amino acids; the latter is very variable, depending on gastric
and intestinal motility, luminal digestion, and finally mucosal
absorption. This lack of data is due to the fact that postprandial
amino acid kinetics have been studied almost exclusively
during continuous feeding, obtained either by a nasogastric
infusion or by small repeated meals (2?7). Measurements are
done 2?4 h after initiation of feeding, once isotopic and
substrate steady-state is achieved. Under these conditions, any
difference related to the speed of dietary amino acid absorption
is blunted.
There is, however, indirect evidence that this parameter
might be of importance. Indeed, the postprandial amino acid
levels differ a lot depending on the mode of administration of


a dietary protein; a single protein meal results in an acute but
transient peak of amino acids (9?11) whereas the same amount
of the same protein given in a continuous manner, which
mimics a slow absorption, induces a smaller but prolonged
increase (12). Amino acids are potent modulators of protein
synthesis, breakdown, and oxidation, so such different patterns
of postprandial amino acidemia might well result in different
postprandial protein kinetics and gain. Of interest, whole body
leucine balance, an index of protein deposition, was shown
recently to differ under these two circumstances (13).
Therefore, our hypothesis was that the speed of absorption
by the gut of amino acids derived from dietary proteins might
affect whole body protein synthesis, breakdown, and oxidation,
which in turn control protein deposition. To test this hypothesis,
we compared those parameters, assessed by leucine
kinetics, after ingestion of a single meal containing either whey
protein (WP) or casein (CAS), taken as paradigms for ??fast??
and ??slow?? proteins, respectively. Indeed, WP is a soluble
protein whereas CAS clots into the stomach, which delays its
gastric emptying and thus probably results in a slower release
of amino acids (14). Speed of amino acid absorption was
directly assessed by using a newly developed tracer, i.e., milk
protein fractions intrinsically labeled with L-[1-13C]leucine
(15). Leucine kinetics were modelized by using non-steadystate
equations as recently described (16). Our results demonstrate
that amino acids derived from CAS are indeed slowly
released from the gut and that slow and fast proteins differently
modulate postprandial changes of whole body protein
synthesis, breakdown, oxidation, and deposition.



I just wanted to post some of the study.. I will include the hyper link below that provides full detail,in regards to fast/slow proteins/and aminos..

(Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein)

Now with this being said more reads in regards-


ne)levels peak during sleep. 75 percent of daily hGH output is produced nse to get all the nutrients you'll need, then let the GH do
tNow what protein is the best to
consume prior to sleeping?
"Casein "

Keep reading

What is casein protein?
Casein (pronounced kay-seen) is the predominant protein found in milk. It is made by separating the casein from the whey in dairy (milk protein is 80 percent casein and 20 percent whey). There are three main types of casein protein: micellar casein, milk protein isolate and calcium caseinate. On average, one scoop (30 grams) of casein protein powder has approximately 100-120 calories and 25 grams of protein.

Besides its slow-digesting benefits, casein is invaluable for its high glutamine content. Of all the protein powders available, casein has the highest concentration of this amino acid. Glutamine provides a multitude of functions, which include increasing levels of the branched chain amino acid leucine in muscle fibers, enhancing protein synthesis and therefore, muscle growth. Because the immune system requires glutamine to function, consuming extra glutamine prevents the immune system from stealing it from muscle fibers, further averting catabolism. Glutamine also boosts growth hormone levels and can even aid fat loss by increasing the amount of calories and body fat burned both at rest and during exercise.

Do ?blended? proteins offer the same effect as straight casein?
Either protein supplements are straight whey, soy, egg or casein; or they are a combination of any or all of these kinds of proteins, making them blends. What can a blend of proteins offer that a straight protein cannot? Basically, different rates of digestion. This means you can take a blended protein any time to get quick, medium, and prolonged absorption of protein.


But, I really like my ?whey? protein supplement.
Turn your favorite whey protein shake into a slow digesting one by simply mixing with milk, preferably low fat or skimmed. While casein protein is ?optimal? before bed, don?t forget that milk is 80 percent casein, adding it to any whey protein will slow down its absorption. Adding a fat such as natural peanut butter, flax or other healthy fat can further slow digestion, thus ?mimicking? casein protein.

_____________________________

To close the read and get to the conclusion here..
Don't deprive yourself, and fall for the hoopla that if you consume your proper intake of macro's that you don't need protein prior to rest/recovery(sleep)..
It most certainly won't hinder your gains on a large scale,but it surely is more beneficial than going without!

Regards,
Vision
 

Paranoid Fitness

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Another great read.

It takes a while to get used to going to bed on a full stomach. You sometimes feel bloated.

I use a 90% whey isolate (unflavored) mixed in nonfat milk with PB and a scoop of superseed blend (hemp, chia and flax) before bed.

I don't recommend the milk for those with lactose issues, obviously.

A lot of people with "lactose intolerance" actually have an issue with digesting the casein (milk protein).

[h=1]Are You Sensitive to Casein in Dairy and Don't Even Know It?[/h]
 

heckler7

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interesting, I try not to eat about 1-2- hours before bed, but I seem to pass out about 15 minutes after my meal so its futile
 

MiSh

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interesting, I try not to eat about 1-2- hours before bed, but I seem to pass out about 15 minutes after my meal so its futile

Where u been heck?


Sent from iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Vision

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I tried the casein (( ewwww )) the stuff is horid, and think as hell too.. but mostly before bed I'll take my peps/GH an then I'll make a shake using nectar protein powder (no carbs,no fat) its like juice...I;ll adds some natty peanut butter and a bananan...at times Ill use the casein, but thats when I sleep for longer then 9-10 hrs after a long shift or that sunday much needed rest day,,

556863_10151794013111376_1914058400_n.jpg

nectar_range.png
 

theCaptn'

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Another great read.

It takes a while to get used to going to bed on a full stomach. You sometimes feel bloated.

I use a 90% whey isolate (unflavored) mixed in nonfat milk with PB and a scoop of superseed blend (hemp, chia and flax) before bed.

I don't recommend the milk for those with lactose issues, obviously.

A lot of people with "lactose intolerance" actually have an issue with digesting the casein (milk protein).

[h=1]Are You Sensitive to Casein in Dairy and Don't Even Know It?[/h]

My evening meal is my largest, and I need to sleep within an hour of eating it. I don't have any digestion issues.

My protein is a self made blend of flavoured WPI and vanilla Casein at a ratio of 2:1 from a bulk store. Covers all the bases I think.
 

Hex Mad House

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Awesome read! I was just reading a similar article last night about myths of eating before bed. Great info that will definitely become part of my nightly regimen. Knowledge is King!
 

Hex Mad House

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The only thing I would add is that if you're going to "convert" your whey protein shake to casein by adding it to milk, you are getting a ton more sugar that way via the milk. If you mix your whey with 2 cups of skim milk, that's roughly 25g of sugar. Whereas most Casein protein powders will likely just have 1g of sugar per scoop. I think the Casein powder is worth the investment. All IMO.
 

Vision

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Vision

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I tried the casein (( ewwww )) the stuff is horid, and think as hell too.. but mostly before bed I'll take my peps/GH an then I'll make a shake using nectar protein powder (no carbs,no fat) its like juice...I;ll adds some natty peanut butter and a bananan...at times Ill use the casein, but thats when I sleep for longer then 9-10 hrs after a long shift or that sunday much needed rest day,,

556863_10151794013111376_1914058400_n.jpg

nectar_range.png

any of you guys try this stuff??
 

Deja Vu

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I used to eat a big meal before bed. I would get acid reflux so bad it would wake me up choking. Almost sleep apnea type symptoms. So now lately I try to not at eat at least an hour before bed.
 

Oldschool

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. Our bodies are in a catabolic state while we sleep. .
Depends on what you ate, when you ate it and how much you ate.
If you sleep 6-8 hours it's highly unlikely you will go into a catabolic state.

- - - Updated - - -

. Our bodies are in a catabolic state while we sleep. .
Depends on what you ate, when you ate it and how much you ate.
If you sleep 6-8 hours it's highly unlikely you will go into a catabolic state.
 
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