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Daily use supplements

Reaper7

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What does everyone use daily?

Cialis - blood pressure/libido support
Sunflower lecithin - load size
NAC - liver support
D3
Ashwagandha - mood support
Fish oil - heart health
 
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Cialis
K2/D3
Fish oil
Multivitamin
 

Matt88

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D3
Diff-stat probiotic
Mts tyrant for cortisol management or sns reduce xt.
Proviron (20mg am, 20mg pm)
 

Matt88

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Is the proviron in addition to trt?
No, I just take it with whatever blast cruise I'm doing at the time to help free up test. My free test likes to ride low otherwise. I also love how it makes me feel.
 

Reaper7

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That’s cool man. Ive never run proviron, maybe I’ll throw it in my next cruise as a feel good component.
No, I just take it with whatever blast cruise I'm doing at the time to help free up test. My free test likes to ride low otherwise. I also love how it makes me feel.
 

01dragonslayer

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Multi
Fish oil
Co Q10
Vit. D
Turmeric
Cal/Mag/Zinc
Apple Cider Vinegar
Digestive enzymes
NAC
Injectable glutathione(M/W/F)
Injectable B Complex(M/W/F)

.....there may be a couple others that I forgot.
 

Reaper7

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That’s cool man. Do you find oral turmeric to be effective? Why injectable over oral b complex?
 

01dragonslayer

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That’s cool man. Do you find oral turmeric to be effective? Why injectable over oral b complex?
b-Complex absorbed much better. I have since gone to a new Turmeric product....the oral bioavailability is much greater. Since that time I do believe its a better product.....I would have achy joints especially in the AM getting out of bed and it has helped with that tremendously.....

 

selfmademonster

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Multi
Fish oil
Co Q10
Vit. D
Turmeric
Cal/Mag/Zinc
Apple Cider Vinegar
Digestive enzymes
NAC
Injectable glutathione(M/W/F)
Injectable B Complex(M/W/F)

.....there may be a couple others that I forgot.
How much of that glutathione you inject weekly?
 

Matt88

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That’s cool man. Ive never run proviron, maybe I’ll throw it in my next cruise as a feel good component.
Start your dose low and taper up. It will make you the most horney u have ever been in your life which can be a little much at times if the dose is to high.
 

Reaper7

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Start your dose low and taper up. It will make you the most horney u have ever been in your life which can be a little much at times if the dose is to high.
Will do. What dose are you currently running, and what did you start with?
 

Jph30

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I’m gonna check this out. I May add this to my NAC. Thanks man. Do you increase the dose during blasts or when using orals?
My understanding is that if you're using injectable glutathione you do not need to take NAC, as NAC works by increasing your body's output of glutathione. So since you're injecting straight glutathione there is no need to also supplement NAC.

I run injectable glutathione EOD on blast, and just a couple times a week on cruise.
 

Matt88

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Will do. What dose are you currently running, and what did you start with?
I'm currently using 40mg a day. I started at 20mg. My new tablets from sb are 50s though so I'll be going to 50mg a day by taking 1/2 AM and 1/2 pm.

Highest I went was 75mg and it was to much.
 

01dragonslayer

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I’m gonna check this out. I May add this to my NAC. Thanks man. Do you increase the dose during blasts or when using orals?
No. I run this regardless if Im cycling or just cruising. It a great supp not just for your liver but your body as a whole. When cycling I will add NAC, Advanced Milk Thistle, Tudca and run those throughout.
 

01dragonslayer

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My understanding is that if you're using injectable glutathione you do not need to take NAC, as NAC works by increasing your body's output of glutathione. So since you're injecting straight glutathione there is no need to also supplement NAC.

I run injectable glutathione EOD on blast, and just a couple times a week on cruise.
This is correct. Your body converts NAC to glutathione. I'll see if I can find something and post it.
 

Reaper7

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H
My understanding is that if you're using injectable glutathione you do not need to take NAC, as NAC works by increasing your body's output of glutathione. So since you're injecting straight glutathione there is no need to also supplement NAC.

I run injectable glutathione EOD on blast, and just a couple times a week on cruise.
Hey man thanks for responding. I overlooked that, So then I guess I’ll replace my NAC. Do you guys inject IM or sub?
 

01dragonslayer

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My understanding is that if you're using injectable glutathione you do not need to take NAC, as NAC works by increasing your body's output of glutathione. So since you're injecting straight glutathione there is no need to also supplement NAC.

I run injectable glutathione EOD on blast, and just a couple times a week on cruise.


What is glutathione?​


Often referred to as the “master” antioxidant because of its capacity to enhance the utilization and recycling of other antioxidants, glutathione (GSH) is a small protein found in virtually all cells. Its primary functions within the body include supporting the immune system, providing antioxidant protection, and removing toxins.1,2 The glutathione molecule is made up of three amino acids: cysteine, glycine, and glutamate. These amino acids act as glutathione “precursors,” and effectively increase the body’s production of glutathione. One of the most studied glutathione precursors is cysteine.


What is cysteine?​


Cysteine is abundant in many foods, particularly foods high in sulfur or protein, such as eggs, soybeans, lentils, chicken, turkey, and fish.3,4 Given that the body can make cysteine from the amino acid methionine, it is technically a non-essential amino acid.5 However, there are times when the body may not be able to keep up with cysteine production. For instance, people that have high blood sugar or high blood pressure levels may need more cysteine to help maintain healthy levels of glutathione—thus cysteine is also considered a semi-essential or conditionally essential amino acid.6


What is N-acetylcysteine (NAC)?​


N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a derivative of the amino acid cysteine.7 When consumed, NAC gets absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract, sent to the liver, and converted to cysteine.8 The liver uses cysteine to produce glutathione, which then enters the bloodstream and gets distributed throughout the body.9


What causes glutathione levels to become depleted?​


Health factors such as aging, infection, poor nutrition, excessive exercise, alcohol use, exposure to toxins, genetic defects, and high blood sugar levels may lead to an unhealthy glutathione status.10,11 Fortunately, some of these factors are “modifiable,” meaning that making healthy lifestyle choices can support healthier glutathione levels.12,13 Conversely, older adults, people with certain medical conditions, and athletes that train extensively may need additional glutathione support to maintain adequate levels.14

Considering all of the factors that may cause glutathione to become depleted, this article is here to help you learn about the research-based benefits associated with having adequate body-stores of glutathione.
 

01dragonslayer

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I’m gonna check this out. I May add this to my NAC. Thanks man. Do you increase the dose during blasts or when using orals?

The benefits of glutathione and NAC​



1. Supports the immune system​


The body’s immune cells require high amounts of glutathione to function optimally.15 In a six-month trial analyzing the effects of glutathione (GSH) supplementation on immune system function, those who supplemented with GSH had higher blood levels of glutathione and greater natural killer cell activity than individuals taking a placebo16 This is significant, given that natural killer cells play an important role in neutralizing infections.

Immune function declines with age, which may be due to falling glutathione levels17 Notably, a 2008 study comparing the immune functions of postmenopausal and younger women found that, after supplementing with NAC for 4 months, the older women’s immune responses more closely matched those of the younger women.18 Additionally, glutathione levels increased in the white blood cells of postmenopausal women taking NAC. These results suggest that positive changes in immune activity are related to having adequate glutathione levels.


2. May help reduce oxidative stress​


Oxidative stress occurs when an imbalance exists between free radicals and antioxidants in the body, and can lead to a variety of health problems.19 A 2018 study found that athletes with low glutathione levels who supplemented with NAC for one month experienced increased glutathione blood levels, reduced oxidative stress, and restored exercise performance.14

Somewhat similarly, a 2011 study found that in those with high blood sugar levels, supplementing with NAC and glycine for two weeks resulted in higher glutathione levels and lower levels of oxidative stress.20 This research demonstrates how important it is for our cells to maintain adequate levels of glutathione.


3. Supports male fertility​


Research finds that problems with male fertility increase when excessive oxidative stress is present in the reproductive system.21 Several trials have evaluated the effects of NAC supplementation on male fertility and oxidative stress.22,23 A 2019 study found that men with fertility problems who supplemented daily with NAC for three months experienced healthier sperm function, higher sperm counts, more favorable hormone levels, and reduced levels of oxidative stress.23 Based on this research, it appears that NAC is a powerful antioxidant that supports male fertility.


4. Increases magnesium levels​


Evidence suggests that having insufficient glutathione may impair magnesium levels.24 For example, those with high blood pressure or high blood sugar tend to also suffer from low levels of glutathione and magnesium.25 In a study evaluating the effects of glutathione on magnesium levels in subjects with and without blood pressure problems, results showed that glutathione administration increased magnesium levels.24 Because magnesium is a vitally important mineral that supports numerous body functions—including blood pressure regulation—ensuring sufficient body stores of glutathione can also help maintain healthy magnesium levels.


5. Regenerates antioxidants​


Glutathione helps regenerate antioxidants such as vitamins C and E.2 Conversely, having low levels of antioxidants may result in oxidative stress and glutathione depletion.26 A 2015 study showed that compared to individuals with adequate vitamin C intake, those with a low intake of vitamin C had depleted levels of glutathione and high levels of oxidative stress.27 This research suggests that vitamin C and glutathione have a synergistic relationship—meaning that glutathione restores vitamin C and vitamin C helps maintain glutathione.


6. Removes toxins​


Glutathione plays an important role in the detoxification of various compounds in the body.28 For instance, its mercury-binding ability helps carry this toxic metal to the urine for elimination.29 Due to rising pollution levels, glutathione is necessary to neutralize the exposures that all of us face daily. If external sources of toxins weren’t enough, the body also creates its own “internal toxins,” which glutathione also helps remove.30


7. May support healthy liver function​


Poor liver function is a common problem that can be exacerbated by a lack of antioxidants, including glutathione.31 Glutathione has a long history of being used to support liver health. A 2017 study explored the effects of four months of oral glutathione supplementation on those with liver problems.32 The results showed that supplementation with glutathione had positive effects on certain markers of liver health.


8. May provide brain-supportive properties​


Research suggests that glutathione regulates glutamate, a vital neurotransmitter responsible for communication between nerve cells in the brain.33 Some people with specific mood problems may have suboptimal glutamate activity, which can impact the health of nerve cells.34 Preliminary studies suggest that the glutathione precursor known as NAC may support healthy brain-glutamate levels.35

A 2020 analysis of several studies reported that, among those experiencing mood problems with repetitive thoughts, those who supplemented with NAC had fewer instances of repetitive thoughts and behaviors, as compared to the placebo group.36 More research is needed to determine if NAC’s brain and mood-supportive properties may be due to its ability to help maintain healthy glutamate levels.


9. Supports cellular health by reducing homocysteine levels​


Homocysteine is an important sulfur-containing amino acid produced by the body that supports several body functions.37 However, excessive production of homocysteine may lead to cardiovascular health problems.38 A review of studies conducted in 2015 found that men supplementing with NAC for 4 weeks had greater reductions in blood homocysteine levels than a placebo group.39 In addition, the men supplementing with NAC experienced healthy changes in blood pressure whereas the placebo group did not. These results suggest that NAC may promote healthier homocysteine and blood pressure levels.


10. May support respiratory health​


The lungs are subjected to high amounts of oxidative stress, which means this organ needs particularly high amounts of glutathione.40 For those with lung problems, maintaining adequate glutathione levels is especially essential.41 A 2015 analysis of several studies reported that among those with lung problems, subjects that received NAC supplements had fewer lung exacerbations as compared to the placebo group.42


Conclusion​


To review, maintaining adequate glutathione levels helps optimize antioxidant levels, maintain immune and respiratory health, support brain and liver health, and increase the body’s capacity to remove toxins. Glutathione also plays a vital role in male fertility, maintaining adequate magnesium levels, and may help support healthier homocysteine and blood pressure levels.

Given glutathione’s importance, the fact that infections, aging, and common medical conditions can deplete glutathione levels mean many of us stand to benefit from supplementing with glutathione or NAC.
 

01dragonslayer

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Glutathione is a powerful antioxidant that has gained a lot of attention for its purported health benefits. But what is glutathione, and does it actually affect the body?
Some people swear by its anti-aging properties, while others say that it can treat autism, increase fat metabolism, and even prevent cancer.
Read on for more information about this antioxidant and what the research says about its effectiveness.

What is glutathione?​

milk thistle
Share on PinterestMilk thistle activates glutathione production in the body.
Glutathione is a powerful antioxidant found in every cell in the body. It is made of three types of molecules known as amino acids.
Amino acids combine in different patterns to make all of the proteins in the body.
One unique thing about glutathione is that the body is able to make it in the liver, which is not true of most antioxidants.
Glutathione has many important functions, including:
  • making DNA, the building blocks of proteins and cells
  • supporting immune function
  • forming sperm cells
  • breaking down some free radicals
  • helping certain enzymes function
  • regenerating vitamins C and E
  • transporting mercury out of the brain
  • helping the liver and gallbladder deal with fats
  • assisting regular cell death (a process known as apoptosis)
Researchers have found links between low levels of glutathione and some diseases. It is possible to increase glutathione levels through oral or intravenous (IV) supplementation.
Another option is to take supplements that activate the natural glutathione production in the body. These supplements include:
  • milk thistle
  • N-acetyl cysteine
  • superoxide dismutase
Reducing toxin exposure and increasing intake of healthful foods are also excellent ways to naturally increase glutathione levels.


What are benefits of glutathione?​

The benefits of glutathione may include:

1. Antioxidant activity​

Free radicals may contribute to aging and some diseases. Antioxidants help to counteract free radicals and protect the body from their damaging effects.
Glutathione is a very strong antioxidant, partly because high concentrations can be found in every cell in the body.

2. Preventing cancer progression​

Some researchTrusted Source shows that glutathione has a role in preventing the progression of cancer.
However, the same research indicates that glutathione may make tumors less sensitive to chemotherapy, which is a common cancer treatment.
Determining the effects of glutathione on cancer will require more research.

3. Reducing cell damage in liver disease​

Hepatitis, alcohol abuse, and fatty liver disease all damage the cells of the liver.
A small 2017 clinical trialTrusted Source concludes that glutathione could help treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease due to its antioxidant properties and potential to detoxify.
The researchers note that larger studies are needed to confirm this effect.

4. Improving insulin sensitivity​

Insulin resistance can result in the development of type 2 diabetes. The production of insulin causes the body to move glucose (sugar) from the blood and into cells that use it for energy.
A small 2018 studyTrusted Source indicates that people with insulin resistance tend to have lower glutathione levels, particularly if they have experienced complications, such as neuropathy or retinopathy. A 2013 studyTrusted Source reaches similar conclusions.

5. Reducing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease​

According to some researchTrusted Source, there is evidence that maintaining glutathione levels may help with the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.
The findings appear to support injected glutathione as a potential therapy, but there is little evidence about oral supplementation. Further research is necessary to support its use.

6. Reducing ulcerative colitis damage​

Like other inflammatory diseases, ulcerative colitis has been linked to oxidative damage and stress.
A 2003 animal studyTrusted Source suggests that glutathione supplementation can improve some of the damage to the colon in rats.
Determining the effects of glutathione on ulcerative colitis will require more research in humans.

7. Treating autism spectrum disorders​

There is some evidence that children with autism have lower levels of glutathione than neurotypical children, or those without autism.
In 2011, researchersTrusted Source found that oral glutathione supplements or injections might reduce some effects of autism. However, the team did not look specifically at the children’s symptoms to see if any had improved, so further research is needed to determine this impact.

Takeaway​

Glutathione is a very strong antioxidant that the body makes and uses every day. Researchers have associated low levels with several medical conditions.
While supplements may be appropriate for some people, they may not be safe for everyone, and they could interact with other medications a person is taking.
Speak with a doctor before starting glutathione supplementation to determine whether it will be safe or effective.
 

01dragonslayer

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Why Glutathione is the Most Popular Supplement for Athletes​

Physical exertion and endurance activities can add unique challenges to having optimal nutrition. Achieving this through diet alone can be difficult, which is why supplemental infusions are often essential. The most popular supplement used by athletes is glutathione, as it has many benefits and is depleted in response to exercise.

What is Glutathione?​

Glutathione is one of the most widely incorporated nutrients. It’s considered to be the “master antioxidant” and is the primary detoxifier and anti-inflammatory agent in every cell of your body. It’s especially helpful in the world of athletics for its ability to prevent and correct tissue damage, unnecessary inflammation, infection, muscular weakness, and fatigue.

Prevent Oxidative Stress​

Glutathione is most well known for its ability to prevent oxidative stress. Oxidative stress happens when there are not enough antioxidants to combat free radicals, causing damage to cells and tissues. Oxidative stress can occur throughout numerous biological systems and results in many negative effects. Glutathione is superior to other antioxidants in preventing oxidative stress because it can neutralize a wide range of free radicals by either directly binding to them or blocking their uptake.

Physically active people are often deficient in glutathione. During exercise, glutathione levels are depleted rapidly due to increased uptake by tissues. The more one exercises, the greater the depletion. This makes oxidative stress more drastic and widespread. It can cause many issues, such as muscle and joint pain, weakness, and vulnerability to infections and injuries.

Improve Muscular Performance​

Following a workout, oxidative stress primarily impacts your muscles. It can cause muscle fatigue, which lovers the amount of force your muscles can perform. Because of this, the ability to make progress during exercise lowers and may need to be put on hold altogether. The time it takes to repair tissue is also affected by lowered glutathione levels, resulting in more intense and longer durations of soreness, muscle and joint pain, and injuries. Glutathione supplementation combats this oxidative stress, decreasing muscle fatigue and aiding in the recovery for intense or endurant physical activity.

Enhance Immunity​

Glutathione plays an essential role in the immune system. It increases or decreases inflammation to a regulated amount by guiding white blood cells. It also restricts negative cytokines, which are proteins that send out signals disrupting a proper inflammatory response. The process of inflammation isn’t only involved in injuries such as a pulled muscle or sprained ligament; it’s also activated for repairing the microscopic muscular tears instantly induced during exercise. Because of this, glutathione is seen as an incredibly effective restorative nutrient that is especially helpful for those who regularly exercise.

Glutathione also aids the immune system in preventing and healing infections and illnesses. Athletes are more susceptible to these because intense exercise lowers one’s immune system. The way glutathione helps is through

commanding certain white blood cells, such as NK and T-cells, to fight off bacteria and viruses.

Effects of Glutathione Supplementation​

Glutathione is a popular supplement for athletes as it offers a diverse range of benefits. It can help:

  • Relieve muscle and joint pain
  • Repair injuries
  • Regulate inflammation
  • Promote muscle protein synthesis and growth
  • Lower risk of illnesses or infection
  • Prevent muscle fatigue
  • Increase energy
  • Improve cardiovascular function
  • Improve physical exertion and stamina
For athletes and those who often partake in exercise, glutathione is a great essential nutrient for intravenous supplementation.
 

01dragonslayer

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Save Muscle Mass with Glutathione - The Master Antioxidant


14 February 2022
Save muscle mass with Glutathione antioxidant

Glutathione is often referred to as The Master Anti-Oxidant. This is because it can be found in nearly every single cell in the body at the same concentration as some of the most important nutrients for energy and cellular function, like glucose, potassium, and even cholesterol.
To really understand glutathione, though, it’s first necessary to know what anti-oxidants are and why you need them.
Antioxidants are molecules that fight free radicals in the body. Free radicals are molecules that can cause harm if their levels become too high in one's cells. They are short-lived ions that may lead to different illnesses, including diabetes, heart disease, and even cancer by damaging cellular DNA.
Your body produces free radicals during metabolism; remember the Krebs Cycle from high-school biology? Your body also uses antioxidants to help keep these free radicals in check. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants. When too many free radicals are produced, they can impair cell regeneration and repair, leading to accelerated aging and certain diseases, as mentioned above.
An article on Medicinenet.com called "What Does Oxidative Stress Mean? Free Radical Damage," says that oxidative stress can lead to symptoms such as:
  • Fatigue
  • Memory loss or brain fog
  • Muscle and/or joint pain
  • Wrinkles
  • Gray hair
  • Decreased eyesight
  • Headache
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Susceptibility to infections
  • Unstable blood sugar levels
Many of you might think, "damn, I have most of those. I thought it was just from aging!" It's true that many of the "symptoms" of aging overlap with these symptoms. It makes sense then to pay attention to our antioxidant levels.

The Master Antioxidant​

You've likely heard of glutathione from social media, your favorite health and beauty posts, or perhaps being touted by an athlete or your personal trainer. But what is glutathione, what does it do, and where does it come from?
Glutathione is comprised of three amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. They are glutamine, cysteine, and glycine. Most of the body's cells make glutathione, but the liver is the real powerhouse, combining these amino acids after they, and sulfur-containing foods, have been ingested. Because so many cells can produce and recycle glutathione, normal blood levels are relatively low. However, there are times when glutathione production might not be able to keep up with demand. Poor nutrition, stress, illness, and environmental toxins can lead to an overall decline in glutathione.
Glutathione’s activity is important to nearly every system in your body. Very often, it is valued for its function in liver detoxification because it binds to heavy metals, chemicals, and other toxic substances, making them more water-soluble and more easily urinated or defecated out.
Glutathione is also abundant in the respiratory system. As one of the first systems in the body to respond to outside threats, your nose, mouth, throat, and lungs constantly respond to large numbers of free radicals from increased oxygen presence, infectious diseases, and toxic environmental exposures such as dust, smog, and smoke. Glutathione is so important in your lungs that the fluid that lines the lungs contains a huge amount of glutathione compared to circulating blood levels.

Age-Related Muscle Loss​

Sarcopenia is the technical term for age-related muscle loss. According to a 2014 review published in The Lancet: Diabetes & Endocrinology, titled Sarcopenia: A Fate Worth Challenging, loss of muscle mass and strength is an important risk factor for accelerating rates of physical disability, hospitalization, and death in the older population. It is associated with progressive health conditions such as heart failure. Muscle mass begins to decline after early middle age and many people will lose a substantial percentage of their quadriceps muscles, the ones that are essential for rising from a sitting position.
Retaining muscle mass and strength is critical as we age. Peak muscle mass and strength is seen between 20 and 30 years of age. Small decreases are noted between ages 30 and 50 and decreases accelerate after the fifth decade of life, with some people experiencing as much as a 15 percent strength loss per decade, with more than 50 percent of fast-twitch muscle fibers being lost by 75 years of age.
But don't wait until then to start! The more muscle mass and tone you have now, the less impact sarcopenia will have later. Staying fit, eating right, and limiting exposure to environmental toxins is a win-win because, according to the Lancet article, "perhaps the biggest concern for the projected burden of sarcopenia is the recognition that accelerated muscle loss occurs in people with diabetes and obesity."
So it's more than just wanting to look fabulous today. Sticking with your exercise routine and healthy diet now will also create a buffer against age-related muscle loss later. If your motivation to do your workout ever wanes, just remember those quadriceps and tell yourself, "If I don't stand up for myself today, I may need help standing up tomorrow!"

Related article: How much muscle can you gain in a month?

Glutathione: The Unsung Hero​

At the risk of glutathione's head getting any bigger, one might wonder how The Master Anti-Oxidant, helps with muscle building. Glutathione helps to preserve the muscle protein synthesis pathway. How? By protecting nitric oxide from free radicals. Nitric oxide is produced within skeletal muscle fibers and has various functions in the skeletal muscles. It is essential for normal glucose uptake during muscle contractions.
Two other antioxidants, vitamin C and vitamin E are both recycled by glutathione, allowing them to be re-used to remove free radicals and decrease oxidative stress. The brain and nervous system are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, in part because of the high percentage of oxygen required for healthy brain function.
Related article: The 5 Best all-natural supplements to boost testosterone in men 2022

Vulgar Fruit? Glutathione and Citrulline Supplementation​

Glutathione isn’t famous as a go-to supplement for supporting muscle mass and strength. However, according to an article in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (JISSN), glutathione may be a key participant in building muscle mass and strength. In a study of men who actively weight lifted, some took 200 mg/day of glutathione and 2 grams/day of citrulline. After 4 weeks, lean muscle mass and strength was significantly increased in the supplement group compared to the placebo group.
Citrulline is an amino acid that was first isolated from watermelon, Citrullus vulgaris. Citrullus meaning fruit (think citrus) and vulgaris meaning... common. Yeah, a bit of a letdown, but hey, you're still reading!
Although citrulline is an amino acid, it is not one of those used by humans to make proteins. But if this is a blog about building/maintaining muscle mass, why should you care about it? The reason we care is that citrulline is converted by the body into arginine which is one of many amino acids that the body DEFINITELY uses to make proteins.
According to the JISSN article mentioned above, unlike arginine, citrulline bypasses the liver and is transported to the kidneys where it is directly converted into arginine. It is also not metabolized in the intestines like arginine is. This means that a lot of citrulline is making it to the kidneys for conversion. The upshot of all this is that citrulline may not be an "essential amino acid," but it acts like one.

Boost Your Glutathione Levels​

Healthy levels of glutathione can be supported in many ways. As mentioned earlier, glutathione is made up of three amino acids: cysteine, glutamine, and glycine. Some consider cysteine to be the bottleneck in the body’s ability to make glutathione because its creation depends on the amount of cysteine available. Supplementing with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can be helpful to increase glutathione production.
According to a Healthline.com article, Top 9 Benefits of NAC (N-Acetyl Cysteine), cysteine is a "semi-essential" amino acid meaning your body can produce it from two other amino acids, methionine and serine. It becomes essential only when the dietary intake of methionine and serine is low. Cysteine is found in most high-protein foods, such as chicken, turkey, yogurt, cheese, eggs, sunflower seeds, and legumes like peanuts. Whey protein supplements are very high in cysteine as well.
Besides being necessary for the creation of glutathione, ingesting enough cysteine and/or NAC is important for a variety of health reasons. This amino acid also helps with chronic respiratory conditions, fertility, brain health, preventing kidney and liver damage, blood-sugar regulation, and immune function.
Lifestyle changes can be supportive of glutathione levels as well. Eating a diet filled with antioxidant-rich foods, such as the Mediterranean diet, can indirectly support healthy glutathione levels. Meditation and breathing techniques that relieve stress have a positive impact on glutathione as does aerobic exercise like walking, swimming, and jogging. Ironically, weight training also increases glutathione levels.
A Healthline.com article, 10 Natural Ways to Increase Your Glutathione Levels, lists these foods/nutrients that help maintain your levels of The Master Anti-oxidant:
  • Whey protein powder: It contains high amounts of cysteine.
  • Sulfur-rich foods: Beef, fish, and poultry; cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, watercress, and mustard greens; allium vegetables like garlic, shallots and onions.
  • Foods that are high in vitamin C.
  • Selenium-rich foods: organ meats, cottage cheese, brown rice, Brazil nuts, or a supplement.

Supplementing glutathione and other antioxidants is yet another strategy. Glutathione can be broken down rapidly in the digestive tract. Because of this, it is important to select a glutathione supplement that is formulated to survive exposure to digestive enzymes and be well absorbed. A study reported by the NIH (National Institutes of Health) found that taking a daily liposomal glutathione supplement, such as Amandean's Liposomal Glutathione, elevated stores of glutathione and impacted immune function and levels of oxidative stress.

Collagen Supplements​

Although cysteine is the only amino acid NOT found in collagen, methionine and serine certainly are. These two amino acids, as mentioned above, are used by the body to make cysteine. Amandean offers many great varieties of collagen supplements that not only provide these two amino acids but all the others that are the building blocks of all proteins found in the body, including muscles. For more information on collagen, see my blog Collagen 101: What Is It and What Is It Good For?

Take-Aways​

Glutathione is The Master Anti-Oxidant and so much more. Studies suggest it can be helpful in muscle building, and as a result, potentially reduce the risk for various age-related health issues, including age-related muscle loss.
Resistance training is instrumental for building and maintaining lean muscle mass and strength and glutathione supplementation may help. Not only that, but all individuals in every life stage can engage in strength training routinely to stay mobile and capable of everyday activities and to prevent falls and fractures. Dumbbells and barbells may appeal to certain populations, but resistance bands or a person’s own body weight can be effective for those who prefer not to join a gym.

Consider these points:
  • Age-related muscle loss begins in our 30s and increases during middle age.
  • Regular exercise/resistance training decreases the likelihood of diabetes and obesity; two major contributors to sarcopenia or age-related muscle loss.
  • Glutathione is a potent antioxidant that protects the cells from disease-causing free radicals and protects the molecules that build muscle.
  • Regular exercise/resistance training is a twofer: They build/maintain muscle mass and increase glutathione levels.
  • Liposomal glutathione supplementation optimizes the health effects of The Master Anti-Oxidant.
  • Supplementation with citrulline is a potent adjunct to glutathione.
  • Supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can be helpful to increasing glutathione production.
  • Whey protein powder, sulfur-rich foods, vitamin C-rich foods, and selenium-rich foods contribute to the production of glutathione.
  • Collagen helps the body make and maintain muscle mass.
 

BigVee

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Good looking out dragonslayer👍. Solid info bro. Ty.
 
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