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why is high Hematocrit bad?

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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarlicChicken View Post
    I'm the opposite, if I don't go often enough my HCT and RD-W rises a bunch and I feel terrible. Bad headaches and everything. About 1/3 of a big in it eases up and goes away. It's crazy. My ferritin has never dropped substantially though. I never heard of this before
    It's actually a great thing when you find something that works for you. I honestly didn't know what was going on at first. I went from high H and H to it being slightly low. I noticed my MCV, MCHC and the like were all out of whack so I ordered a TIBC test and viola, iron and ferritin were rock bottom. Mind you this was after donating every 8 weeks for a little over a year. It took a lot of ferrous sulfate and quite a bit of time to get those numbers back to normal. I felt like death lol.

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    Thats exactly what I think happened to me and now I am going to through what I consider unnecessary tests to try to figure out why my ferritin is so low and I already told the doctor and the nurse that my bloods were drawn less than a week after I donated.
    Quote Originally Posted by xstarchildx View Post
    That's awesome that it's working for you. It does for many. And heck, you're saving lives in the process! I personally can't donate frequently at all or my ferritin plummets. Talk about feeling like chit!

  3. #18
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    There are research papers floating around suggesting that frequent blood donations and iron deficiency are tied together- I think it was like >3 donations per year tied to deficiency
    Quote Originally Posted by GarlicChicken View Post
    I'm the opposite, if I don't go often enough my HCT and RD-W rises a bunch and I feel terrible. Bad headaches and everything. About 1/3 of a big in it eases up and goes away. It's crazy. My ferritin has never dropped substantially though. I never heard of this before

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9TMARE View Post
    Makes sense. Putting sludge in with the pure would only make sludgy pure blood. So far never been denied! Going every 3 months is definitely the way to go.
    It does not make any sense at all. They literally put red blood cells as a component into transfusions for patients. That is why they take double reds - that process in the apheresis machine removes the other components and just takes a double portion of red blood cells from you, reinserting all the other stuff back into your veins.

    They transfuse whatever is needed to the patient using components, including red blood cells (which are the most common component).

    Guess what they do with whole blood donations? They split it into components. It is only very rarely used as-is for transfusion.

  5. #20
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    In most itís caused by dehydration and certain meds. In ya high dose trt, EQ, tren, var. Itís a red flag for them for those reasons and it means your blood is too thick. Itís no use to them. Itís hard to give someone your thick blood.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by lifter6973 View Post
    There are research papers floating around suggesting that frequent blood donations and iron deficiency are tied together- I think it was like >3 donations per year tied to deficiency
    In our study, an important proportion of subjects (12%) abandoned 2RBC donation on medical advice because of low SF levels (generally below 30 ng/mL), even in the absence of anaemia and of symptoms of iron deficiency. This practice largely reflects the uncertainty about the course of Hb and SF levels in repeated 2RBC donors, with a perceived greater risk for iron deficiency anaemia associated with this procedure compared to conventional WB donation. Although only very few donors of our cohort were excluded from 2RBC apheresis because of inadequate Hb levels, it is possible that in a larger number of subjects the decrease in Hb values below critical levels was prevented by an earlier deferral due to low SF. Interestingly, 25 cases already had low SF levels at their first apheresis. To our knowledge, there are no published data on the effects of 2RBC collection in subjects with low base-line iron stores. Such evaluations, as well as a comparison of different 2RBC donation frequencies on the course of Hb and SF levels, would be extremely valuable in order to optimise donation strategies targeted at preventing iron deficiency anaemia and thus avoiding donor loss.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5016297/

  7. #22
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    This is somewhat similar to what I remember seeing- I actually saw something recent about regular donations- It was either a Canadian Journal or Canadian authors. Id be more inclined to trust it if authors were from US - but Canadian research should be trustworthy
    Quote Originally Posted by malfeasance View Post
    In our study, an important proportion of subjects (12%) abandoned 2RBC donation on medical advice because of low SF levels (generally below 30 ng/mL), even in the absence of anaemia and of symptoms of iron deficiency. This practice largely reflects the uncertainty about the course of Hb and SF levels in repeated 2RBC donors, with a perceived greater risk for iron deficiency anaemia associated with this procedure compared to conventional WB donation. Although only very few donors of our cohort were excluded from 2RBC apheresis because of inadequate Hb levels, it is possible that in a larger number of subjects the decrease in Hb values below critical levels was prevented by an earlier deferral due to low SF. Interestingly, 25 cases already had low SF levels at their first apheresis. To our knowledge, there are no published data on the effects of 2RBC collection in subjects with low base-line iron stores. Such evaluations, as well as a comparison of different 2RBC donation frequencies on the course of Hb and SF levels, would be extremely valuable in order to optimise donation strategies targeted at preventing iron deficiency anaemia and thus avoiding donor loss.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5016297/

  8. #23
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    Question...why ferrous sulfate vs ferrous gluconate? I see ferrous gluconate prescribed a lot or you can get it OTC- not sure about sulfate
    Quote Originally Posted by xstarchildx View Post
    It's actually a great thing when you find something that works for you. I honestly didn't know what was going on at first. I went from high H and H to it being slightly low. I noticed my MCV, MCHC and the like were all out of whack so I ordered a TIBC test and viola, iron and ferritin were rock bottom. Mind you this was after donating every 8 weeks for a little over a year. It took a lot of ferrous sulfate and quite a bit of time to get those numbers back to normal. I felt like death lol.

  9. #24
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    Looks like I need to google- you can get ferrous sulfate OTC too- just wondering if one is better than the other or what the difference in for those looking to get their levels back to normal- also, once you got your levels back to normal, were you able to stop taking the ferrous sulfate and have iron/ferritin numbers remain in normal range? I assume you dont donate or at least not frequently anymore??

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by lifter6973 View Post
    Looks like I need to google- you can get ferrous sulfate OTC too- just wondering if one is better than the other or what the difference in for those looking to get their levels back to normal- also, once you got your levels back to normal, were you able to stop taking the ferrous sulfate and have iron/ferritin numbers remain in normal range? I assume you dont donate or at least not frequently anymore??
    Great question! Both would actually suffice, but some have GI distress with one and not the other. Ferrous sulfate seemed to cause me no discomfort so I went with that.

    I no longer donate and have been able to mange my RBC's by doing daily injections. It seems to have stabilized. Though I run a little bit high (typically around 17.0 HG and 53 ish crit, platelets are great and I have great oxygen recovery as well as output, so I'm happy

  11. #26
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    what are you injecting daily?- do you mean you keep your RBCs stabilized by injecting AAS daily? you dont have to take iron supplementation anymore, correct?
    Quote Originally Posted by xstarchildx View Post
    Great question! Both would actually suffice, but some have GI distress with one and not the other. Ferrous sulfate seemed to cause me no discomfort so I went with that.

    I no longer donate and have been able to mange my RBC's by doing daily injections. It seems to have stabilized. Though I run a little bit high (typically around 17.0 HG and 53 ish crit, platelets are great and I have great oxygen recovery as well as output, so I'm happy

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9TMARE View Post
    Makes sense. Putting sludge in with the pure would only make sludgy pure blood. So far never been denied! Going every 3 months is definitely the way to go.
    I haven't donated since I started cycling but I suspect I feel pretty good when I do. My blood pressure was too high when I attempted my first donation. I was on drol then, so I should he good now.

  13. #28
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    My H&H are almost always slightly elevated when I donate. They have never turned me away. I have to admit I feel really good after I donate. I can't remember where I found this link (may have been from someone here at ASF so I can't take credit) but this study concluded the regular donations are not effective to keep H in range. I have to assume it does lower it a bit in-between donations but found this to be interesting.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28150363

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by malfeasance View Post
    It does not make any sense at all. They literally put red blood cells as a component into transfusions for patients. That is why they take double reds - that process in the apheresis machine removes the other components and just takes a double portion of red blood cells from you, reinserting all the other stuff back into your veins.

    They transfuse whatever is needed to the patient using components, including red blood cells (which are the most common component).

    Guess what they do with whole blood donations? They split it into components. It is only very rarely used as-is for transfusion.
    this is exactly what I was saying, if they do double reds they obviously will take as much RBC from you as they can so if you hematicrit is too high they are getting more RBC per pint

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by heckler7 View Post
    this is exactly what I was saying, if they do double reds they obviously will take as much RBC from you as they can so if you hematicrit is too high they are getting more RBC per pint
    The hematocrit is a ratio of the volume of red blood cells to the volume of all the components together, called whole blood. They check hematocrit not because they are concerned about your RBC count, but more so to measure the fluid levels. They want you healthy and well before you donate- hydrated mainly. So that's the reason they don't get excited for your high hematocrit, because it doesn't necessarily mean you have high RBCs, it just means your ratio is not optimal for your health. You could have high RBCs and drink a lot of water and have a healthy hematocrit count. It's all about the ratio. Hematocrit checks are apart of vitals for this reason.

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