Painting my Ram 1500 in Bedliner

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  1. #16
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    That hemi sounds so nice when you get on her tho. I told my wife i knew I shoulda traded it in when I said I it 2 years ago. I’m gonna go ahead and “fix”the rust.... do the entire lower body line and down in bed liner then sell it outright. I figure I can get 10k easily... 124k miles and still runs like a monster... then I’ll buy me a shitbox for the winter and cross my fingers something good comes my way come next spring.

    thank you for all the insight. It’s tough being a broke blue collar but every dog has his day.

  2. #17
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    Is it possible to just buy a whole bed with no rust?...I considered it but it cost $3000 aftermarket!...

  3. #18
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    So I'd hate to say but the real way to fix it is to cut all the rust out until you hit good metal and then weld new metal in..

  4. #19
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    That’s like putting lipstick on a pig. One more year of NY salt and it won’t even pass state inspection. Sell it to some high school kid and buy a decent used pick up.
    Serious.

  5. #20
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    Shit I fell ya bud I just got a $35k camper for under $8k now im rushing to sell my truck and benz to get a newer diesel to pull the camper. Be nice if I could go drop $15-$30k on a truck but I've gotta keep my investments rolling can't drop it all in 1 toy. Hopefully I can find 1 after I sell my rides to buy silly cheap $10k for a nice 1, probably look in tx,ga,KY wherever there cheaper.
    Last edited by weazel; 08-02-2021 at 05:42 PM.

  6. #21
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    The rust problem with older ram trucks is a result of 2 thin layers of metal on the body...the layers are not cinched tight enough...all of the salty water is kicked up by the tires and seeps in between the 2 layers...the first winter is the beginning of the end...a trick that some guys have used is to squirt engine oil in-between the 2 layers of a new truck...the oil will coat the metal which does not allow the salt to adhere and do it's damage especially around the tire wells...dodge had to be aware of this from the engineering and did/does not care...

  7. #22
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    Yeah they go cheap on the metal to keep the price down. They sell a lot of trucks so in a marketing perspective they’ve got a loyal customer base and new owners seem to like the price range.

    I hate to say it but I think I’m going Silverado next time......

  8. #23
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    Also I don't think they galvanize dip the body's anymore. Which in turn causes the rusting at very fast rates. I could be wrong.
    I thought someone on here owned a body shop but I could be wrong. I'm sure they would have some insight.

    They best way to fix rust is cut out the rust then replace with new sheet metal or if you can find fiberglass panels can do that also. Also if your rocker panels are solid still you can drill 2 small holes where the bottom door closes then pour transmission fluid into the holes. The transmission fluid will prevent them from rusting out. I've heard many people using this technique in the North. Also spray down frame and body panels with tranny fluid is a option as a potential rust stopper.

  9. #24
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    Tall deck would know. Whatever happened to that dude?

    anyways... if I have time I’m gonna paint this bitch in rhino liner and sell it to some rich kid and buy a delorean, weld a Reese hitch to it and pull a wagon everywhere I go.

    will post pics

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    If you could post some pics, it would be easier to estimate the damage. In any case, you can't hesitate, and the sooner you fix it, the better. Hope in future you start washing your car frequently, wax it up and remove any rust as soon as it appears.


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  11. #26
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    use a product called Rust Seal by kbs Coatings. take your door panels off and pour it down into the doors. it will be messy, but that will get it into the pinch welds and stop the rust. that generation of dodges do that. dont use trana fluid. for the rockers do the same or go to the body shop store and buy cavity wax. insert the wand in a hole in the rocker and spray. trust me. I know
    Last edited by Big Puppy; 08-04-2021 at 12:08 AM.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milford King View Post
    you mis understand bud. The bed of my truck is sealed with rhino liner (bed liner).. the wheel wells and cab corners are starting to rust and bubble which means the rust (once I sand it down) is probably through the metal.

    im going to patch it up and then I was going to paint the ENTIRE truck in bedliner. In an effort to slow down the rust. I figured because of its texture and thickness it would offer slightly more protection from the salt.

    just wanted to hear from any other dumbasses who may have done this themselves and regretted it.

    If it is a "toy off road build" sure paint the truck with bedliner. When done right it looks good and protects when wheeling off road. if it is a daily driver only.... I'd pass...

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by E.J.D View Post
    Also I don't think they galvanize dip the body's anymore. Which in turn causes the rusting at very fast rates. I could be wrong.
    I thought someone on here owned a body shop but I could be wrong. I'm sure they would have some insight.

    They best way to fix rust is cut out the rust then replace with new sheet metal or if you can find fiberglass panels can do that also. Also if your rocker panels are solid still you can drill 2 small holes where the bottom door closes then pour transmission fluid into the holes. The transmission fluid will prevent them from rusting out. I've heard many people using this technique in the North. Also spray down frame and body panels with tranny fluid is a option as a potential rust stopper.
    About the only thing galvanized was the cowl vent panels even on older vehicles.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CowboyPump77 View Post
    If it is a "toy off road build" sure paint the truck with bedliner. When done right it looks good and protects when wheeling off road. if it is a daily driver only.... I'd pass...

    - - - Updated - - -



    About the only thing galvanized was the cowl vent panels even on older vehicles.
    Not the way I understand it from the following article

    History of Galvanized Steel in the Automotive Industry
    Galvanized steel is among the most popular and useful steels due to its durability, cost effectiveness and, most importantly, its rust-resistant qualities. But galvanized steel wasn’t always in high demand.

    In the early 1990’s, steel was consistently the go-to material in automobile manufacturing, but public demand for corrosion-resistant steels in the North American market hadn’t become wide enough for manufacturers to begin implementing it.

    In fact, it wasn’t until the late 1980’s, when the Japanese began importing automobiles with anti-corrosion features, that Western markets would discover the advantage of the material. Galvanized steel was indispensable in Japan, a country with a coastal environment that created heavier levels of oxidation and rust.

    A close up of a headlight on a rusty car.

    At the time, North American made vehicles were experiencing severe durability issues due to rust – a serious issue that (quite literally) couldn’t be solved by just throwing on another coat of paint.

    Western automakers had developed specific standards for their warranties which further exacerbated the problem of switching to galvanized steels, as its implementation into processing lines would take serious time and money. However, forced to compete, they began to make the transition.

    This important switch led to the use of electrogalvanizing lines.

    “Electrogalvanizing is a process in which a layer of zinc is bonded to steel in order to protect against corrosion. The process involves electroplating, running a current of electricity through a saline/zinc solution with a zinc anode and steel conductor. The plating of zinc was developed at the beginning of the 20th century. At that time, the electrolyte was cyanide based. A significant innovation occurred in the 1960s, with the introduction of the first acid chloride based electrolyte…The 1980s saw a return to alkaline electrolytes, only this time, without the use of cyanide.” (Source: Wikipedia)

    Going into the mid 90’s, electrogalvanizing was the only process that was approved for automotive quality; but automakers had set their sights on another way to galvanize steel – hot dip galvanization. This technique was being used in other markets, but hadn’t yet reached the level of quality necessary for automobiles. That is, until the 1990’s.

    Nowadays, the use of zinc-coated bodies for automobiles is standard procedure in auto manufacturing. The ‘body-in-white’ of a car makes up about 80% of the body, all using galvanized steel. The rust resistance of galvanized steel is also a good marketing tool for the automotive industry because they can provide anti-rust warranties to customers.

    What are the Benefits of Galvanized Steel?

    There’s a reason so many different industries utilize galvanized steel. It has a wide array of benefits for industries to take advantage of, including:

    Low initial cost compared to most treated steels.
    Lower maintenance costs than most coated steels (saves time on repairs and replacements).
    Increases durability of the steel’s finished product which also increases the product’s reliability.
    Galvanized steel is very protective, including sharp corners and recesses that couldn’t be protected with other coatings, making it resistant to damage.
    Self-healing, meaning the galvanized coating includes an automatic protection for damaged areas. The coating will corrode preferentially to the steel, creating a sacrificial protection to the areas that are damaged.

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