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    Lower back pumps

    Y誕ll know of anything that can help with lower back pumps on cycle? I知 running test and 100mg drol per day and I always get crazy back pumps all fucking day while I知 on orals. I知 sure there痴 not much that can help it but any suggestion would help. I知 already drinking 3 gallons of water per day and I知 taking NAC and milk thistle
    When the hood drops, the bullshit stops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swolewelder View Post
    Y誕ll know of anything that can help with lower back pumps on cycle? I知 running test and 100mg drol per day and I always get crazy back pumps all fucking day while I知 on orals. I知 sure there痴 not much that can help it but any suggestion would help. I知 already drinking 3 gallons of water per day and I知 taking NAC and milk thistle
    Taurine 4-8g a day

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by buki1718 View Post
    Taurine 4-8g a day

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    Thank you I値l give it a shot
    When the hood drops, the bullshit stops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swolewelder View Post
    Y誕ll know of anything that can help with lower back pumps on cycle? I知 running test and 100mg drol per day and I always get crazy back pumps all fucking day while I知 on orals. I知 sure there痴 not much that can help it but any suggestion would help. I知 already drinking 3 gallons of water per day and I知 taking NAC and milk thistle
    lower back pumps are my absolute kryptonite, no matter what oral, especially anavar and anadrol, I get lower back pumps just walking out taking the trash to the can.

    when it gets that bad during my lifting sessions I do weighted hangs, I put the belt on with a few plates on the chain and I just hang from the pull up bar. I also bought a few of those rollers with the nubs and I put that on the floor and roll around on it.. I also learned from a chiropractor to implement a lot of knees to chest stretching.. have someone hold down your one straight leg at the same time their chest is on your bent leg, pushing off of your straight leg forcing their weight on your bent leg that's on their chest and just hold it, and rotate.. he explained to me that not only is it a form of compartment syndrome from all the fluid, but the fluid gets trapped in there because of scar tissue.. the scar tissue occurs over time and it resembles much of a weaved basket Criss crossing, and the fluid cannot leave once it gets in there..

    if I'm doing any movements that agitate it, I'll go and find the machine and sit down and use that in a time being just to let everything subside..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vision View Post
    lower back pumps are my absolute kryptonite, no matter what oral, especially anavar and anadrol, I get lower back pumps just walking out taking the trash to the can.

    when it gets that bad during my lifting sessions I do weighted hangs, I put the belt on with a few plates on the chain and I just hang from the pull up bar. I also bought a few of those rollers with the nubs and I put that on the floor and roll around on it.. I also learned from a chiropractor to implement a lot of knees to chest stretching.. have someone hold down your one straight leg at the same time their chest is on your bent leg, pushing off of your straight leg forcing their weight on your bent leg that's on their chest and just hold it, and rotate.. he explained to me that not only is it a form of compartment syndrome from all the fluid, but the fluid gets trapped in there because of scar tissue.. the scar tissue occurs over time and it resembles much of a weaved basket Criss crossing, and the fluid cannot leave once it gets in there..

    if I'm doing any movements that agitate it, I'll go and find the machine and sit down and use that in a time being just to let everything subside..
    Damn that痴 some good advice, I知 gunna try some stretching in between sets because as of this week dead痴 and RDLs are a no go lol. And work has been pretty unbearable, I spend a lot of my day bent over welding so the back pumps have made my job awful lmao. Thanks for the suggestions guys
    When the hood drops, the bullshit stops.

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    I got an inversion table, it seems to help

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swolewelder View Post
    Damn that痴 some good advice, I知 gunna try some stretching in between sets because as of this week dead痴 and RDLs are a no go lol. And work has been pretty unbearable, I spend a lot of my day bent over welding so the back pumps have made my job awful lmao. Thanks for the suggestions guys
    Welding will do it.. its a job of waiting and waiting for progress, you can be have a bad posture while doing something and not even realize it until you already blew your back out for the day.
    The knee to chest works great. I love it.. the hangs are much like the inversion table, but with weights. Back pumps are a curse to some people. Let us know how you make out. But please, you owe it to yourself to try the knee to chest stretch with a partner.. just give a shot, I promise you'll see what I mean..

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    Stick with the nac, drop that milk thistle supplement tudca 250mg. Stretch out your back bro

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    I am the exact same way when it comes to orals.. terrible back pumps, and in my calves as well.

    First, drop your Anadrol dosage down to 50mg. More is not better.. if orals are causing the problem.. drop the the oral, or lower the dosage.

    Taking a lot of Taurine worked well for me in the past.. I'd usually take 10g in the AM, and then another 10g mixed in with my preworkout later in the day. Taking potassium can also help. Drink plenty of water.. which it sounds like you are doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by STTM View Post
    I am the exact same way when it comes to orals.. terrible back pumps, and in my calves as well.

    First, drop your Anadrol dosage down to 50mg. More is not better.. if orals are causing the problem.. drop the the oral, or lower the dosage.

    Taking a lot of Taurine worked well for me in the past.. I'd usually take 10g in the AM, and then another 10g mixed in with my preworkout later in the day. Taking potassium can also help. Drink plenty of water.. which it sounds like you are doing.
    Jump roping is impossible on orals, the tibialis anterior fills with to much blood and the compartment just stays swelled. Excruciating.

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    Here's some info I put together and a study included.. It can apply to back,forarms,shins, etc etc.. I'll high-lite in blue what may be the trigger mechanism in the back..It's known as "CECS"..

    AAS induced forearm pump? Well, it may be a little more than that!

    Over the years we've seen threads/posts where individuals stress unbearable pumps in many regions of the body, lower back, shins, and at times "forearms".. I'm one of them that wail and moan about debilitating forearm pumps, hindering my gym session entirely at times.

    Some users see this as a keen indication that their compounds may in fact be legit/authentic, but unbeknownst to them, it could be a hidden unknown aliment known as "CECS" during hyperemia (which we expect due to load and stress)..That's not the danger here tho, its the exit flow response that's the culprit (read on)

    How AAS/Steroids contribute
    We all can agree that through the presences of AAS there will be an increase with RBC'c, nitrogen, increase in blood flow/circulation, increased CV performance, along with increased BP..With this said, many of us may already possess a genetic-predisposition, inducing an already preexisting condition that may not typically be a factor normally, it may be a slight annoyance when under heavy stress/exertion, or maybe it's mild and tolerated for some..
    However, it may increase while taking exogenous hormones amplifying the discomfort, Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS) of the Forearm..
    Best regards,
    Vision
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Below is a study in regards to this:
    Arm Pump -
    Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS) of the Forearm

    What is it?
    Arm pump is a clinical condition in which an individual develops intermittent marked pain in the forearms after a period of exercise or exertion. The pain is thought to arise due to swelling of the muscles of the forearm that affects the blood flow to these muscle and causes the oxygen levels to drop.

    Who gets it?
    Arm pump typically affects younger adults, mainly men. It is most commonly associated with motor sports such as motocross and road racing, but other activities such as paddling, weight lifting and mountaineering can induce this condition. It is thought that riders participating in motocross and road racing are particularly affected due to the combination of vibration, forced grip and repeated wrist movements to control the throttle. The symptoms typically start approximately 7 minutes in to the race.

    How do I know if I have it?
    This is not a common condition but it should be considered in an individual who develops marked forearm pain after a period of exertion that settles spontaneously after a period of rest (ranging from 12 minutes to 24 hours). The forearm will typically feel hard and tight while the pain is present. Numbness in the hand, or cramping of the muscles of the forearm, weakness or clumsiness may occur.

    How is the diagnosis made?
    To make the diagnosis your doctor will ask you questions and will perform special tests. Often the clinical examination will be normal. Your doctor will usually refer you to a specialist surgeon for investigation when the diagnosis is suspected. The specialist may recommend serial MRI scans of the arms at rest, immediately after exercise and every five minutes for a period of 15 minutes but this is quite an expensive investigation. MRI scan may help to exclude other causes of forearm pain (see below). The condition can be diagnosed by direct measurement of the pressure within the muscles. This can only be done by passing a needle through the skin into the muscle under local anaesthetic and connecting this needle to a pressure device. This is an invasive procedure and should only be performed by a specialist. The diagnosis is said to be supported if the pressures are >10mmHg at rest and >20mmHg 1 and 5 minutes after exertion. The speed that the pressure returns to baseline after exertion may be a more reliable diagnostic determinant. An increase in the circumference of the forearm on exertion may also be found.

    How is the condition treated?
    Attempts at symptom control by activity modification and rest should be tried first but are not always successful. Arm pump can be treated by surgery to release the fascia (connective tissue covering) of the muscle. This is usually done under a general anaesthetic and the tissue can either be split or removed. The outcomes of these two procedures are thought to be the same. Where the diagnosis is correct successful outcome can be expected in the majority of patients (80-90%). Patient satisfaction has been reported to be very high following this procedure.

    What happens after the operation?
    After surgical fasciectomy/fasciotomy the patient must rest the arm. The arm is bandaged but a splint is not required. The wound must be kept dry for 10 days. Active mobilisation exercises are undertaken. Most individuals can return to their sport/occupation at four to six weeks after surgery. Performance may be improved after surgery for some individuals.

    What other conditions have similar symptoms?
    Tendinopathies (such as tennis or golfers elbow) of the forearm muscles, blood vessel or nerve entrapment may present with similar symptoms and should be excluded.
    References:



    1. BrownJS, Wheeler PC, Boyd KT, Barnes MR, Allen MJ. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm: acase series of 12 patients treated with fasciotomy. JHS(E) 2011;36E(5):413-419.
    2. RaphaelBS, Paletta GA, Shin SS. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm in a major league baseball pitcher. Am J Sports Med2011;39:2242-2244.
    3. BerlemannU, Al-Momani Z, Hertel R. Exercise induced compartment syndrome in the flexor pronator muscle group. Am J Sport Med 1998;26:3
    4. PedowitzRA, Toutounghi F. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm flexor muscles. JHS(A) 1988;13(5):694-696
    5. WinkesMB, LuitenE, van ZoetsWJF, SalaHA, HoogeveenAR, ScheltingaMR. Long term results of surgical decompression of chronic exertional compartments syndrome of the forearm in motorcross racers. Am J Sports MEd 2012;40(2):452-458


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    One suggestion: avoid high rep dropsets and banded work on hyperextensions. Talk about a miserable drive home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vision View Post
    Here's some info I put together and a study included.. It can apply to back,forarms,shins, etc etc.. I'll high-lite in blue what may be the trigger mechanism in the back..It's known as "CECS"..

    AAS induced forearm pump? Well, it may be a little more than that!

    Over the years we've seen threads/posts where individuals stress unbearable pumps in many regions of the body, lower back, shins, and at times "forearms".. I'm one of them that wail and moan about debilitating forearm pumps, hindering my gym session entirely at times.

    Some users see this as a keen indication that their compounds may in fact be legit/authentic, but unbeknownst to them, it could be a hidden unknown aliment known as "CECS" during hyperemia (which we expect due to load and stress)..That's not the danger here tho, its the exit flow response that's the culprit (read on)

    How AAS/Steroids contribute
    We all can agree that through the presences of AAS there will be an increase with RBC'c, nitrogen, increase in blood flow/circulation, increased CV performance, along with increased BP..With this said, many of us may already possess a genetic-predisposition, inducing an already preexisting condition that may not typically be a factor normally, it may be a slight annoyance when under heavy stress/exertion, or maybe it's mild and tolerated for some..
    However, it may increase while taking exogenous hormones amplifying the discomfort, Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS) of the Forearm..
    Best regards,
    Vision
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Below is a study in regards to this:
    Arm Pump -
    Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome (CECS) of the Forearm

    What is it?
    Arm pump is a clinical condition in which an individual develops intermittent marked pain in the forearms after a period of exercise or exertion. The pain is thought to arise due to swelling of the muscles of the forearm that affects the blood flow to these muscle and causes the oxygen levels to drop.

    Who gets it?
    Arm pump typically affects younger adults, mainly men. It is most commonly associated with motor sports such as motocross and road racing, but other activities such as paddling, weight lifting and mountaineering can induce this condition. It is thought that riders participating in motocross and road racing are particularly affected due to the combination of vibration, forced grip and repeated wrist movements to control the throttle. The symptoms typically start approximately 7 minutes in to the race.

    How do I know if I have it?
    This is not a common condition but it should be considered in an individual who develops marked forearm pain after a period of exertion that settles spontaneously after a period of rest (ranging from 12 minutes to 24 hours). The forearm will typically feel hard and tight while the pain is present. Numbness in the hand, or cramping of the muscles of the forearm, weakness or clumsiness may occur.

    How is the diagnosis made?
    To make the diagnosis your doctor will ask you questions and will perform special tests. Often the clinical examination will be normal. Your doctor will usually refer you to a specialist surgeon for investigation when the diagnosis is suspected. The specialist may recommend serial MRI scans of the arms at rest, immediately after exercise and every five minutes for a period of 15 minutes but this is quite an expensive investigation. MRI scan may help to exclude other causes of forearm pain (see below). The condition can be diagnosed by direct measurement of the pressure within the muscles. This can only be done by passing a needle through the skin into the muscle under local anaesthetic and connecting this needle to a pressure device. This is an invasive procedure and should only be performed by a specialist. The diagnosis is said to be supported if the pressures are >10mmHg at rest and >20mmHg 1 and 5 minutes after exertion. The speed that the pressure returns to baseline after exertion may be a more reliable diagnostic determinant. An increase in the circumference of the forearm on exertion may also be found.

    How is the condition treated?
    Attempts at symptom control by activity modification and rest should be tried first but are not always successful. Arm pump can be treated by surgery to release the fascia (connective tissue covering) of the muscle. This is usually done under a general anaesthetic and the tissue can either be split or removed. The outcomes of these two procedures are thought to be the same. Where the diagnosis is correct successful outcome can be expected in the majority of patients (80-90%). Patient satisfaction has been reported to be very high following this procedure.

    What happens after the operation?
    After surgical fasciectomy/fasciotomy the patient must rest the arm. The arm is bandaged but a splint is not required. The wound must be kept dry for 10 days. Active mobilisation exercises are undertaken. Most individuals can return to their sport/occupation at four to six weeks after surgery. Performance may be improved after surgery for some individuals.

    What other conditions have similar symptoms?
    Tendinopathies (such as tennis or golfers elbow) of the forearm muscles, blood vessel or nerve entrapment may present with similar symptoms and should be excluded.
    References:



    1. BrownJS, Wheeler PC, Boyd KT, Barnes MR, Allen MJ. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm: acase series of 12 patients treated with fasciotomy. JHS(E) 2011;36E(5):413-419.
    2. RaphaelBS, Paletta GA, Shin SS. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm in a major league baseball pitcher. Am J Sports Med2011;39:2242-2244.
    3. BerlemannU, Al-Momani Z, Hertel R. Exercise induced compartment syndrome in the flexor pronator muscle group. Am J Sport Med 1998;26:3
    4. PedowitzRA, Toutounghi F. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm flexor muscles. JHS(A) 1988;13(5):694-696
    5. WinkesMB, LuitenE, van ZoetsWJF, SalaHA, HoogeveenAR, ScheltingaMR. Long term results of surgical decompression of chronic exertional compartments syndrome of the forearm in motorcross racers. Am J Sports MEd 2012;40(2):452-458

    Very interesting, I had never heard of that. Thanks for the write up!
    When the hood drops, the bullshit stops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swolewelder View Post
    Very interesting, I had never heard of that. Thanks for the write up!
    believe it or not you and me had the same conversation with the same information above some time ago, but I completely forgot myself. I posted it as a reminder. LOL.

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