PDA

View Full Version : Resting Heart Rate



malfeasance
12-13-2017, 06:19 AM
What do you do to get your resting heart rate down???


I am a half century old.

My resting heart rate a few years ago was in the 70s.

It is sitting right now at 104.

I like having muscles and abs, but I am not looking to die of heart attack or stroke in the next decade.


I stopped all pinning over a week ago (but given how much I sweated last night I am still jammed full of tren, I guess). I was pumped full of test, tren, mast, T4, T3, hgh, and ECA. Nothing, however, for 10 days now. No weightlifting, either (I strained something in my neck/upper back and had to take a break).

I have started doing cardio on a stairmaster. I had been cutting without cardio.

Started Saturday at 20 minutes, Sunday 25 minutes, M & T off, Wednesday (today) 30 minutes, 383 calories burned according to the machine.

Oddly, Saturday cardio was tough, but today was much easier, indicating some sort of adaptive response has occurred already.

How long does it take a resting heart rate to reduce through cardio?

I am 10% or lower bodyfat (see pics in my log, From Fattie to Abs Before 50, to judge for yourself).

I am particularly interested in hearing from those of you who have actual experience in reducing your resting heart rate.

Lokthan
12-13-2017, 06:23 AM
Thatís odd. I can go from 130-150heart rate to under 100 in just a few minutes and then sits in the 70s.

In the army they had us walk and measure heart rate until it was under 100beats per I think a minute. If it was higher then they just kept having us walk.

Right now though if I do some heavy deep breaths and then try and sync my breathing with my heart rate I can bring it down quickly


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

malfeasance
12-13-2017, 07:03 AM
Are you suggesting I start walking and do not stop until it comes down? LOL!

It sounds like your resting heart rate is in the 70s, where mine used to be a couple years ago, so I am not sure how much you can help me, unless your resting heart rate (not exercising heart rate) has been higher at some point in the past.

malfeasance
12-13-2017, 07:04 AM
Resting heart rate is your heart rate when RESTING, like for 5 minutes minimum, and I do not mean 5 minutes after running two miles.

Mine is over 100. This is not good. This is not right. My feet stick out of bed all night. And when I pull them in, Oh, dear! My head sticks out of bed up here!

Oldschool
12-13-2017, 07:08 AM
Let the juice clear your system for a month or so and try again.
In the meantime up the sex.
Cant hurt...

Skip Foursome
12-13-2017, 07:08 AM
I am not an expert on this topic.

I am 59 years old, 6-2, 210 pounds and for the most part under 15% body fat year round.

My heart rate gets into the 70s on AAS...maybe 80s and low 50s when off AAS.

For me, doing cardio in the gym does very little for my heart rate. But when I am riding my bike outdoors for 1-2 hours 3-4 days a week I see a marked difference.

Downside to that? I could not eat clean or enough, I had to fuel myself up for those rides that were so calorie dependant so it did mess with my efforts in the gym.

Lokthan
12-13-2017, 07:08 AM
Damn then ya thatís not to good. Have you seen a doc yet


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

judgmentalist
12-13-2017, 07:13 AM
The only way to really affect your resting HR is to increase your cardiovascular fitness level. Steady state cardio work is shit for that. E.G. jogging on a treadmill for twenty minutes where you keep your HR in the130s or whatever doesnít help your CV fitness or resting HR very much.

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is what you need. Get your HR up to 100-115% of your theoretical max for your age for a short time, 30-90 seconds, then continue at a recovery pace until you can go again - probably about 60-90 seconds. Do this about 20 minutes every day or a couple times a day, depending on how bad you want it. You wonít really burn enough calories to hurt your B.B. goals, but you will quickly discover that you now have the resting HR of a dead African Elephant and you can sprint up the side of a skyscraper like fn Spider-Man without breathing hard.

Just be sure you donít have any underlying CV problems before you start pushing yourself that hard.

I push myself until I think my heart is about to explode - well over my supposed max for my age, but I had a full work up last year and they said my heart was G2G so Iím taking them at their word. :)



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Oldschool
12-13-2017, 07:29 AM
Damn then ya thatís not to good. Have you seen a doc yet


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

He's got one foot in the grave ... at 59...

judgmentalist
12-13-2017, 08:30 AM
I am not an expert on this topic.

I am 59 years old, 6-2, 210 pounds and for the most part under 15% body fat year round.

My heart rate gets into the 70s on AAS...maybe 80s and low 50s when off AAS.

For me, doing cardio in the gym does very little for my heart rate. But when I am riding my bike outdoors for 1-2 hours 3-4 days a week I see a marked difference.

Downside to that? I could not eat clean or enough, I had to fuel myself up for those rides that were so calorie dependant so it did mess with my efforts in the gym.

Cycling (real world) is my favorite,naturally HIIT exercise. If you live anywhere with any kind of variable terrain there will automatically be sections that require maximum effort and vice versa. I was at my fittest CV-wise when I was cycling to work every day.

In my experience 6-8 hours a week in the saddle is definitely enough to wear most people down. Gains and recovery may slow significantly. However, your CV fitness and resting HR will be ridiculous at that level. 20 minutes per session is the minimum effective dose, IMHO.

Skip, on a two hour ride did you carry a couple of those little sugar/gel packs? I found that a couple of those could get me through anything up to about 40 miles or so without a big drop in performance.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

malfeasance
12-13-2017, 08:39 AM
riding my bike outdoors for 1-2 hours 3-4 days a week I see a marked difference.

Downside to that? I could not eat clean or enough, I had to fuel myself up for those rides that were so calorie dependant so it did mess with my efforts in the gym. I was biking to work not that long ago, when I worked closer to home.

The first couple of times was very humbling. There are some hills on my ride. Cardiovascular fitness is revealed very quickly on a bicycle.

I got 5 miles down to under 20 minutes in spite of the hills. Round trip, though, I calculated it at 600 calories for the day - that's a lot of calories to make up. I work much farther from home now, although sometimes I can work from home, and maybe a bike ride in the middle of the day, when traffic is low, would be perfect for this.

The biggest deal is finding the time to ride here. Winter, lots of dark, no shoulders on the roads, to be honest it kind of scares me to death to ride out there with the traffic. Maybe I will do it once in a while anyway. I have been considering it. The bike is just sitting there, collecting dust.

malfeasance
12-13-2017, 08:44 AM
The only way to really affect your resting HR is to increase your cardiovascular fitness level. Steady state cardio work is shit for that. E.G. jogging on a treadmill for twenty minutes where you keep your HR in the130s or whatever doesnít help your CV fitness or resting HR very much. In the gym I do a stairmaster. I only ever did cardio to burn fat, and I could not burn fat on a treadmill to save my life. Anyway, the stair master is set on a setting that varies the intensity, and my heart rate, although I have not actually measured it during the exercise, gets much higher than 130. In years past when I was younger (40s) I used to push my peak heart rate up to 185-190 on an elliptical, going all out for 60 seconds and then moderate for three minutes and then all out for 60 seconds and so on . . .


High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is what you need. Get your HR up to 100-115% of your theoretical max for your age for a short time, 30-90 seconds, then continue at a recovery pace until you can go again - probably about 60-90 seconds. Do this about 20 minutes every day or a couple times a day, depending on how bad you want it. You wonít really burn enough calories to hurt your B.B. goals, but you will quickly discover that you now have the resting HR of a dead African Elephant and you can sprint up the side of a skyscraper like fn Spider-Man without breathing hard.

Just be sure you donít have any underlying CV problems before you start pushing yourself that hard.

I push myself until I think my heart is about to explode - well over my supposed max for my age, but I had a full work up last year and they said my heart was G2G so Iím taking them at their word. :)

I have never heard that HIIT is best for lowering resting heart rate, so this suggestion is new. I will try to see if I can find any research that backs up your claim.

Have you any actual experience lowering your own resting heart rate?

Let the juice clear your system for a month or so and try again.
In the meantime up the sex.
Cant hurt...
Sex is daily and rough. LOL!

But I imagine if I let ALL the juice clear for a month sex is going to become a nonstarter due to libido issues? I was thinking of maintaining TRT levels at least . . .

Skip Foursome
12-13-2017, 09:01 AM
Cycling (real world) is my favorite,naturally HIIT exercise. If you live anywhere with any kind of variable terrain there will automatically be sections that require maximum effort and vice versa. I was at my fittest CV-wise when I was cycling to work every day.

In my experience 6-8 hours a week in the saddle is definitely enough to wear most people down. Gains and recovery may slow significantly. However, your CV fitness and resting HR will be ridiculous at that level. 20 minutes per session is the minimum effective dose, IMHO.

Skip, on a two hour ride did you carry a couple of those little sugar/gel packs? I found that a couple of those could get me through anything up to about 40 miles or so without a big drop in performance
I use either Gu Gels or Hammer Gels. I usually start out about 45 minute into a ride taking one Gel and do so every hour or two after. I also carry Clif Bars which I call fig paste bars. I eat these about every two hours. I'm sure you already know about this but you really have to stay on top of eating carbs on your ride. If you get too far behind on consuming carbs you will bonk, basically mean run out of energy and you will not get it back that day without suffering. Which means a very miserable experience getting back to the trailhead or where you started as you will have very low energy but have 12 miles to go.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
...

Skip Foursome
12-13-2017, 09:07 AM
I was biking to work not that long ago, when I worked closer to home.

The first couple of times was very humbling. There are some hills on my ride. Cardiovascular fitness is revealed very quickly on a bicycle.

I got 5 miles down to under 20 minutes in spite of the hills. Round trip, though, I calculated it at 600 calories for the day - that's a lot of calories to make up. I work much farther from home now, although sometimes I can work from home, and maybe a bike ride in the middle of the day, when traffic is low, would be perfect for this.

The biggest deal is finding the time to ride here. Winter, lots of dark, no shoulders on the roads, to be honest it kind of scares me to death to ride out there with the traffic. Maybe I will do it once in a while anyway. I have been considering it. The bike is just sitting there, collecting dust.
Road riding is tough and it bugs the shit out of me riding on the road. I prefer to mountain bike and is all I do. I decided this last summer to try riding to the trailhead from my house and I will never do it again. I hate being at the mercy of shitty and distracted drivers.

For a two hour ride my FitBit says I burn in upwards of 1,200 calories.

Mountain biking is way more strenuous than road riding and at some points you go anaerobic, using your muscles more than your cardiovascular system. Hard to explain but I go anaerobic on the steepest of climbs, I might last a whole minute doing that.

As to winter I am dealing with that now. Too cold, too windy, too dark although I do have lights for my bike.

judgmentalist
12-13-2017, 09:33 AM
I have never heard that HIIT is best for lowering resting heart rate, so this suggestion is new. I will try to see if I can find any research that backs up your claim.

Have you any actual experience lowering your own resting heart rate?


Yep. A few years back I was cycling to work about 10 miles each way. I would race myself everyday with a timer and HR monitor. After a few months of that my resting HR was super low, like high 40s. I think I was in the 70s when I started.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

judgmentalist
12-13-2017, 09:36 AM
Road riding is tough and it bugs the shit out of me riding on the road. I prefer to mountain bike and is all I do. I decided this last summer to try riding to the trailhead from my house and I will never do it again. I hate being at the mercy of shitty and distracted drivers.

For a two hour ride my FitBit says I burn in upwards of 1,200 calories.

Mountain biking is way more strenuous than road riding and at some points you go anaerobic, using your muscles more than your cardiovascular system. Hard to explain but I go anaerobic on the steepest of climbs, I might last a whole minute doing that.

As to winter I am dealing with that now. Too cold, too windy, too dark although I do have lights for my bike.

You mountain guys are nuts man! I canít hang with yíall; I like all my bones where they are right now. :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

rubisean
12-13-2017, 04:51 PM
Beta blocker

Sent from my SM-G935P using Tapatalk

LowTman
12-13-2017, 06:52 PM
How old are you? 104 is not that concerning for now. What is more important than 104 is what is normal for you. Did it just go to 104 recently? How long has it been at 104? The average person is between 80-100. Your normal may just be in the high end of normal. Your answer to these questions will paint a better picture of your situation.

LowT

malfeasance
12-14-2017, 07:27 AM
How old are you? 104 is not that concerning for now. What is more important than 104 is what is normal for you. Did it just go to 104 recently? How long has it been at 104? The average person is between 80-100. Your normal may just be in the high end of normal. Your answer to these questions will paint a better picture of your situation.

LowT
My age and normal resting heart rate are in the first post, but to make it easy, 50 years old and my normal resting heart rate is in the 70s. It would go to 90s on gear (even on a gram of test and 900 deca it did not go to 100) but would always return when lowering dosages. I was recently on test, tren (at 700), mast, hgh, T3, T4, ECA, to cut down to 10% or less bodyfat, but I have ingested and injected nothing at all in 11 days, nada. I have started doing cardio. My resting heart rate was 107 this morning.

Skip Foursome
12-14-2017, 07:32 AM
My age and normal resting heart rate are in the first post, but to make it easy, 50 years old and my normal resting heart rate is in the 70s. It would go to 90s on gear (even on a gram of test and 900 deca it did not go to 100) but would always return when lowering dosages. I was recently on test, tren (at 700), mast, hgh, T3, T4, ECA, to cut down to 10% or less bodyfat, but I have ingested and injected nothing at all in 11 days, nada. I have started doing cardio. My resting heart rate was 107 this morning.
What is your BP?

ordawg1
12-14-2017, 08:46 AM
How much water are you drinking per day ? Thanks-OD

LowTman
12-14-2017, 08:58 AM
My age and normal resting heart rate are in the first post, but to make it easy, 50 years old and my normal resting heart rate is in the 70s. It would go to 90s on gear (even on a gram of test and 900 deca it did not go to 100) but would always return when lowering dosages. I was recently on test, tren (at 700), mast, hgh, T3, T4, ECA, to cut down to 10% or less bodyfat, but I have ingested and injected nothing at all in 11 days, nada. I have started doing cardio. My resting heart rate was 107 this morning.

50 yo Hx of resting HR of 70, now +100. Your meds are legit. Your HR should come down over the next week. Possibly the T4. Curious what your BP is?

For what itís worth, my sister (Dr.) sent me a study a couple weeks ago about the thyroid, TSH, free T3 & T4, as my wife has issues with her Thyroid and just had surgery To remove it. I recall that T4 continued to impact the patient +4 weeks after discontinuing meds. My wife is all over the place. She had a resting low 65 and as high as 140.

Seems your doing the right thing stopping medx and monitoring it closely.

LowT

NPower65
12-15-2017, 09:11 AM
Howís the Caffeine intake?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Flipper
12-15-2017, 10:15 AM
Fifty, 205, 12% and I'm all hopped up on Test E, Test P, Deca, Proviron, and A-Dex; my resting heart rate as I write this is 68. I would heartily recommend (pun intended) staying away from the Tren.

malfeasance
12-15-2017, 10:21 AM
Howís the Caffeine intake?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 7-8 cups of black tea a day.

Blood pressure 131/82 (meds)

Resting heart rate dropped to 98 this a.m.

NPower65
12-15-2017, 11:23 AM
7-8 cups of black tea a day.

Blood pressure 131/82 (meds)

Resting heart rate dropped to 98 this a.m.

Try dropping the caffeine 376mg isnít a lot but plays a part and see what happens. Mine was in the high 90s and dropped caffeine went below 80


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

bmoney
12-15-2017, 11:34 AM
Yoga bro! Also look into a thing called an ŌURA ring. It measure sleep and HRV along with your lowest resting heart rate at night. Itís been a game changer for me as far as tracking recovery.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

NPower65
12-15-2017, 02:59 PM
Yoga bro! Also look into a thing called an ŌURA ring. It measure sleep and HRV along with your lowest resting heart rate at night. Itís been a game changer for me as far as tracking recovery.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Yoga kicks my ass best way to sweat your ass off LOL but really it does help too!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

ROID
12-15-2017, 03:17 PM
The only way to really affect your resting HR is to increase your cardiovascular fitness level. Steady state cardio work is shit for that. E.G. jogging on a treadmill for twenty minutes where you keep your HR in the130s or whatever doesnít help your CV fitness or resting HR very much.

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is what you need. Get your HR up to 100-115% of your theoretical max for your age for a short time, 30-90 seconds, then continue at a recovery pace until you can go again - probably about 60-90 seconds. Do this about 20 minutes every day or a couple times a day, depending on how bad you want it. You wonít really burn enough calories to hurt your B.B. goals, but you will quickly discover that you now have the resting HR of a dead African Elephant and you can sprint up the side of a skyscraper like fn Spider-Man without breathing hard.

Just be sure you donít have any underlying CV problems before you start pushing yourself that hard.

I push myself until I think my heart is about to explode - well over my supposed max for my age, but I had a full work up last year and they said my heart was G2G so Iím taking them at their word. :)



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Where did you get that info?

LowTman
12-15-2017, 05:24 PM
7-8 cups of black tea a day.

Blood pressure 131/82 (meds)

Resting heart rate dropped to 98 this a.m.

^^^Good news.

LowT

judgmentalist
12-16-2017, 03:09 AM
Where did you get that info?

Personal research and experience. Iím not a doctor and I donít expect anyone to do anything I say blindly. Iím just offering what I have accumulated where I have a little experience. Feel free to confirm or deny for yourself. :). That having been said, it takes a long time to research something like this for yourself, and I never bothered to maintain a bibliography of support articles for my own use. I just read, test, draw my own conclusions and move on.

I donít think I have all the answers; I already forgot to consider medication etc., in my answer. It actually sounds like the OP is going to have good success without doing anything I suggested.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

malfeasance
12-18-2017, 10:09 AM
Resting heart rate has dropped to 90 this a.m.


After 14 days of no pinning, I resumed with 100 mg test. I will do 200 mg test weekly for a while to see how things go.

Will start bicycling some, soon.

tren2k14
12-18-2017, 04:38 PM
Resting heart rate has dropped to 90 this a.m.


After 14 days of no pinning, I resumed with 100 mg test. I will do 200 mg test weekly for a while to see how things go.

Will start bicycling some, soon.

They have beta blockers to lower heart rate have you seen your dr?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

tren2k14
12-18-2017, 04:39 PM
Sorry didnít read through whole post


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

malfeasance
12-27-2017, 11:58 AM
Down to 85 now . . . definitely a big difference from where I was at way up over 100.

Riding a bicycle is hard work. :(